Discussion:
What the heck is in a hotdog?
(too old to reply)
Sam Hopkins
2003-10-13 18:34:36 UTC
Permalink
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?

Sam
Don Bruder
2003-10-13 20:16:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
What's in a hot dog?
Chances are you'll never find anybody who will even *TRY* to
*OFFICIALLY* detail the list for you, if only because most folks are too
squeamish to think about eating certain parts of a dead cow. Simple
economics: You don't sell wieners by telling every person who asks
exactly what bits and pieces go into 'em. Quite bluntly, there are
*VERY* few people out there who actually *REALLY* want to know. They may
*SAY* they want to, but the fact is, they'd really rather go through
life munching down their wieners without ever considering just what kind
of scraps they were made out of, and finding out would, well... "put 'em
off their feed." Their delusion about how hot dogs grow pre-packaged on
wiener-trees would be trashed if they knew the reality, and quite
frankly, most can't accept that. For me personally, "beef is beef" - be
it a slab of prime rib chopped out of the still-twitching carcass I just
put a bullet in 5 minutes ago, a corned brisket, a burger at
Mickey-Dee's, or a Ball Park all-beef wiener. I don't particularly care
where on the cow it came from (although some cuts are, obviously, better
than others for various reasons), I just care that it came from a cow.

Unofficially, it's pretty easy:
Any scraps, trimmings, mis-cuts, bruised meat, and so on that can't
easily be sold "stand-alone", and for whatever reason (texture, color,
strong flavor, whatever) aren't considered useful for hamburger. There
really isn't any such thing as a dedicated "hot dog plant" - hot dogs
are pretty much the "catch all" for any scraps of meat left over at the
end of the overall carcass processing operation. They typically get made
only after after the last of the "suitable to be hamburger" stuff has
been finished.

Hooves? No. Those get sold to the guy who boils them down and makes
"Knox" and Jell-O and Elmer's glue, or to somebody that wants to sell
them as doggy-treats. *AFTER* the meaty contents of the hoof have been
removed and stuffed into the grinder, that is...

Butts? Probably not, (Think "rump roast", "butt steak", etc) but
trimmings from butts, almost certainly.

Lips? Tounge? Ears? Eyeballs? Cheek meat (From a pig, you'd put that in
gelatin, and refer to the resulting block of "mystery meat" as head
cheese)? Necks? Noses? Tails? Almost certainly to all of them except
tounge, which is fairly often sold as a standard beef cut. Outfits that
don't want to (or just plain can't - tounge seems to be something of a
regional taste (no pun intended)) sell it will cheerfully shovel that
into the grinder with all the rest, although it'll more likely be the
hamburger grinder rather than the one they use for wieners. (Never mind
the detail that the wiener grinder is probably also the hamburger
grinder, just set for a much finer grind)

Basically, anything too small, "too disgusting", "esthetically
un-appealing", and so on to be used/sold as a cut of its own is probably
going to end up going into the grinder, right along with anything that
can be boiled/scraped/otherwise removed from the bones.

Then there's the guts... some of which, in the case of "natural casing"
weiners, serve as - You guessed it - the tubes that them little pink
tube-steaks get pumped into.

The age-old chestnut about hot dogs being made of "assholes, lips and
eyeballs" really isn't all *THAT* far wrong...

And don't even get started on pork sausage...
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net <--- Preferred Email - SpamAssassinated.
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great info.
I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart
Fly trap info pages: <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
Sam Hopkins
2003-10-13 20:59:06 UTC
Permalink
Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my hotdogs, does
anyone want to answer what the heck is in spam?

Sam
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
What's in a hot dog?
Chances are you'll never find anybody who will even *TRY* to
*OFFICIALLY* detail the list for you, if only because most folks are too
squeamish to think about eating certain parts of a dead cow. Simple
economics: You don't sell wieners by telling every person who asks
exactly what bits and pieces go into 'em. Quite bluntly, there are
*VERY* few people out there who actually *REALLY* want to know. They may
*SAY* they want to, but the fact is, they'd really rather go through
life munching down their wieners without ever considering just what kind
of scraps they were made out of, and finding out would, well... "put 'em
off their feed." Their delusion about how hot dogs grow pre-packaged on
wiener-trees would be trashed if they knew the reality, and quite
frankly, most can't accept that. For me personally, "beef is beef" - be
it a slab of prime rib chopped out of the still-twitching carcass I just
put a bullet in 5 minutes ago, a corned brisket, a burger at
Mickey-Dee's, or a Ball Park all-beef wiener. I don't particularly care
where on the cow it came from (although some cuts are, obviously, better
than others for various reasons), I just care that it came from a cow.
Any scraps, trimmings, mis-cuts, bruised meat, and so on that can't
easily be sold "stand-alone", and for whatever reason (texture, color,
strong flavor, whatever) aren't considered useful for hamburger. There
really isn't any such thing as a dedicated "hot dog plant" - hot dogs
are pretty much the "catch all" for any scraps of meat left over at the
end of the overall carcass processing operation. They typically get made
only after after the last of the "suitable to be hamburger" stuff has
been finished.
Hooves? No. Those get sold to the guy who boils them down and makes
"Knox" and Jell-O and Elmer's glue, or to somebody that wants to sell
them as doggy-treats. *AFTER* the meaty contents of the hoof have been
removed and stuffed into the grinder, that is...
Butts? Probably not, (Think "rump roast", "butt steak", etc) but
trimmings from butts, almost certainly.
Lips? Tounge? Ears? Eyeballs? Cheek meat (From a pig, you'd put that in
gelatin, and refer to the resulting block of "mystery meat" as head
cheese)? Necks? Noses? Tails? Almost certainly to all of them except
tounge, which is fairly often sold as a standard beef cut. Outfits that
don't want to (or just plain can't - tounge seems to be something of a
regional taste (no pun intended)) sell it will cheerfully shovel that
into the grinder with all the rest, although it'll more likely be the
hamburger grinder rather than the one they use for wieners. (Never mind
the detail that the wiener grinder is probably also the hamburger
grinder, just set for a much finer grind)
Basically, anything too small, "too disgusting", "esthetically
un-appealing", and so on to be used/sold as a cut of its own is probably
going to end up going into the grinder, right along with anything that
can be boiled/scraped/otherwise removed from the bones.
Then there's the guts... some of which, in the case of "natural casing"
weiners, serve as - You guessed it - the tubes that them little pink
tube-steaks get pumped into.
The age-old chestnut about hot dogs being made of "assholes, lips and
eyeballs" really isn't all *THAT* far wrong...
And don't even get started on pork sausage...
--
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great info.
I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart
<http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
JMartin
2003-10-13 21:13:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my hotdogs, does
anyone want to answer what the heck is in spam?
Spam is made from old hot dogs!

There are certain parts of cows that are not allowed to be used for human
food. I know eyeballs are on the list, but not sure what else. Testicles
from old bulls? No doubt they are in the dogs. Not sure about other
organs. Try checking the USDA or FSA site.

They have been jumping all over beef producers to inject only in the neck,
so we don't leave "bad" spots in the meat. I wonder if those bad spots go
in the hot dogs....

Jena
Post by Sam Hopkins
Sam
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a
hotdog?"
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say,
"Beef
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc
of
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
What's in a hot dog?
Chances are you'll never find anybody who will even *TRY* to
*OFFICIALLY* detail the list for you, if only because most folks are too
squeamish to think about eating certain parts of a dead cow. Simple
economics: You don't sell wieners by telling every person who asks
exactly what bits and pieces go into 'em. Quite bluntly, there are
*VERY* few people out there who actually *REALLY* want to know. They may
*SAY* they want to, but the fact is, they'd really rather go through
life munching down their wieners without ever considering just what kind
of scraps they were made out of, and finding out would, well... "put 'em
off their feed." Their delusion about how hot dogs grow pre-packaged on
wiener-trees would be trashed if they knew the reality, and quite
frankly, most can't accept that. For me personally, "beef is beef" - be
it a slab of prime rib chopped out of the still-twitching carcass I just
put a bullet in 5 minutes ago, a corned brisket, a burger at
Mickey-Dee's, or a Ball Park all-beef wiener. I don't particularly care
where on the cow it came from (although some cuts are, obviously, better
than others for various reasons), I just care that it came from a cow.
Any scraps, trimmings, mis-cuts, bruised meat, and so on that can't
easily be sold "stand-alone", and for whatever reason (texture, color,
strong flavor, whatever) aren't considered useful for hamburger. There
really isn't any such thing as a dedicated "hot dog plant" - hot dogs
are pretty much the "catch all" for any scraps of meat left over at the
end of the overall carcass processing operation. They typically get made
only after after the last of the "suitable to be hamburger" stuff has
been finished.
Hooves? No. Those get sold to the guy who boils them down and makes
"Knox" and Jell-O and Elmer's glue, or to somebody that wants to sell
them as doggy-treats. *AFTER* the meaty contents of the hoof have been
removed and stuffed into the grinder, that is...
Butts? Probably not, (Think "rump roast", "butt steak", etc) but
trimmings from butts, almost certainly.
Lips? Tounge? Ears? Eyeballs? Cheek meat (From a pig, you'd put that in
gelatin, and refer to the resulting block of "mystery meat" as head
cheese)? Necks? Noses? Tails? Almost certainly to all of them except
tounge, which is fairly often sold as a standard beef cut. Outfits that
don't want to (or just plain can't - tounge seems to be something of a
regional taste (no pun intended)) sell it will cheerfully shovel that
into the grinder with all the rest, although it'll more likely be the
hamburger grinder rather than the one they use for wieners. (Never mind
the detail that the wiener grinder is probably also the hamburger
grinder, just set for a much finer grind)
Basically, anything too small, "too disgusting", "esthetically
un-appealing", and so on to be used/sold as a cut of its own is probably
going to end up going into the grinder, right along with anything that
can be boiled/scraped/otherwise removed from the bones.
Then there's the guts... some of which, in the case of "natural casing"
weiners, serve as - You guessed it - the tubes that them little pink
tube-steaks get pumped into.
The age-old chestnut about hot dogs being made of "assholes, lips and
eyeballs" really isn't all *THAT* far wrong...
And don't even get started on pork sausage...
--
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great
info.
Post by Don Bruder
I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart
<http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
Patrick Sonnek
2003-10-13 21:34:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my hotdogs, does
anyone want to answer what the heck is in spam?
Sam
If you didn't like hearing what is in hotdogs, you definitly do not want
to know what is spam (let's just say it contains pig. And leave it at
that.) (appologies to Terry Prachett www.lspace.org)
--
For good laugh at computer security, go to
http://www.vseasy.com/Security_Humor.html
Ann
2003-10-13 23:29:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my hotdogs, does
anyone want to answer what the heck is in spam?
Sam
Why not just skip to the "ultimate", scrapple. May not still be the case,
but the labels used to be explicit.
Post by Sam Hopkins
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a
hotdog?"
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say,
"Beef
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc
of
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
What's in a hot dog?
Chances are you'll never find anybody who will even *TRY* to
*OFFICIALLY* detail the list for you, if only because most folks are too
squeamish to think about eating certain parts of a dead cow. Simple
economics: You don't sell wieners by telling every person who asks
exactly what bits and pieces go into 'em. Quite bluntly, there are
*VERY* few people out there who actually *REALLY* want to know. They may
*SAY* they want to, but the fact is, they'd really rather go through
life munching down their wieners without ever considering just what kind
of scraps they were made out of, and finding out would, well... "put 'em
off their feed." Their delusion about how hot dogs grow pre-packaged on
wiener-trees would be trashed if they knew the reality, and quite
frankly, most can't accept that. For me personally, "beef is beef" - be
it a slab of prime rib chopped out of the still-twitching carcass I just
put a bullet in 5 minutes ago, a corned brisket, a burger at
Mickey-Dee's, or a Ball Park all-beef wiener. I don't particularly care
where on the cow it came from (although some cuts are, obviously, better
than others for various reasons), I just care that it came from a cow.
Any scraps, trimmings, mis-cuts, bruised meat, and so on that can't
easily be sold "stand-alone", and for whatever reason (texture, color,
strong flavor, whatever) aren't considered useful for hamburger. There
really isn't any such thing as a dedicated "hot dog plant" - hot dogs
are pretty much the "catch all" for any scraps of meat left over at the
end of the overall carcass processing operation. They typically get made
only after after the last of the "suitable to be hamburger" stuff has
been finished.
Hooves? No. Those get sold to the guy who boils them down and makes
"Knox" and Jell-O and Elmer's glue, or to somebody that wants to sell
them as doggy-treats. *AFTER* the meaty contents of the hoof have been
removed and stuffed into the grinder, that is...
Butts? Probably not, (Think "rump roast", "butt steak", etc) but
trimmings from butts, almost certainly.
Lips? Tounge? Ears? Eyeballs? Cheek meat (From a pig, you'd put that in
gelatin, and refer to the resulting block of "mystery meat" as head
cheese)? Necks? Noses? Tails? Almost certainly to all of them except
tounge, which is fairly often sold as a standard beef cut. Outfits that
don't want to (or just plain can't - tounge seems to be something of a
regional taste (no pun intended)) sell it will cheerfully shovel that
into the grinder with all the rest, although it'll more likely be the
hamburger grinder rather than the one they use for wieners. (Never mind
the detail that the wiener grinder is probably also the hamburger
grinder, just set for a much finer grind)
Basically, anything too small, "too disgusting", "esthetically
un-appealing", and so on to be used/sold as a cut of its own is probably
going to end up going into the grinder, right along with anything that
can be boiled/scraped/otherwise removed from the bones.
Then there's the guts... some of which, in the case of "natural casing"
weiners, serve as - You guessed it - the tubes that them little pink
tube-steaks get pumped into.
The age-old chestnut about hot dogs being made of "assholes, lips and
eyeballs" really isn't all *THAT* far wrong...
And don't even get started on pork sausage...
--
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great
info.
Post by Don Bruder
I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart
<http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
Roy
2003-10-14 00:11:48 UTC
Permalink
===<>> Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my hotdogs,
===<>does
===<>> anyone want to answer what the heck is in spam?
===<>>
===<>> Sam
===<>
===<>Why not just skip to the "ultimate", scrapple. May not still be the case,
===<>but the labels used to be explicit.
Or some hogs head cheese, or perhaps souse. Nothing in the world is
wrong with scrapple or souse or hogs head cheese, its all mind over
matter. Scapple is exceptionally good eating, when pan fried to a
golden brown, and covered in Kayo syrup or mollassas, along with a
couple of good fresh yard eggs and a stack of hotcakes. Its fine fried
and between two slices of bread, its fine anywhich way brakfast lunch
or dinner.

Same for hot dogs and sausgae spam, or vienna sausages...........its
still edible, and has good taste, some may be high in sodium but its
still fine eating.

Look at what a free range chicken eats maggots, bugs, other dead
critters, worms peck in its own droppings as well as cows and other
animal wastes, forages inthe composte pile, and it lays a great
tasting egg, and no one gives a second though when it comes to making
fried chicken............

All mind over matter!


Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com
Opinions expressed are those of my wifes,
I had no input whatsoever.
Remove "nospam" from email addy.
Ann
2003-10-14 00:34:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roy
===<>> Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my hotdogs,
===<>does
===<>> anyone want to answer what the heck is in spam?
===<>>
===<>> Sam
===<>
===<>Why not just skip to the "ultimate", scrapple. May not still be the case,
===<>but the labels used to be explicit.
Or some hogs head cheese, or perhaps souse. Nothing in the world is
wrong with scrapple or souse or hogs head cheese, its all mind over
matter. Scapple is exceptionally good eating, when pan fried to a
golden brown, and covered in Kayo syrup or mollassas, along with a
couple of good fresh yard eggs and a stack of hotcakes. Its fine fried
and between two slices of bread, its fine anywhich way brakfast lunch
or dinner.
You forgot to mention using lard to fry it. <vbg>
Post by Roy
Same for hot dogs and sausgae spam, or vienna sausages...........its
still edible, and has good taste, some may be high in sodium but its
still fine eating.
Look at what a free range chicken eats maggots, bugs, other dead
critters, worms peck in its own droppings as well as cows and other
animal wastes, forages inthe composte pile, and it lays a great
tasting egg, and no one gives a second though when it comes to making
fried chicken............
All mind over matter!
Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com
Opinions expressed are those of my wifes,
I had no input whatsoever.
Remove "nospam" from email addy.
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 03:02:25 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2003, 12:11am (CDT+5) From:
***@hotmail.com (Roy)
On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 23:29:47 GMT, "Ann" <***@epix.net> wrote:
===<>"Sam Hopkins" wrote
===<>> Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my
hotdogs, ===<>does
===<>> anyone want to answer what the heck is in spam?
===<>>
===<>> Sam
===<>
===<>Why not just skip to the "ultimate", scrapple. May not still be the
case, ===<>but the labels used to be explicit.
Or some hogs head cheese, or perhaps souse. Nothing in the world is
wrong with scrapple or souse or hogs head cheese, its all mind over
matter. Scapple is exceptionally good eating, when pan fried to a golden
brown, and covered in Kayo syrup or mollassas, along with a couple of
good fresh yard eggs and a stack of hotcakes. Its fine fried and between
two slices of bread, its fine anywhich way brakfast lunch or dinner.
Same for hot dogs and sausgae spam, or vienna sausages...........its
still edible, and has good taste, some may be high in sodium but its
still fine eating.
Look at what a free range chicken eats maggots, bugs, other dead
critters, worms peck in its own droppings as well as cows and other
animal wastes, forages inthe composte pile, and it lays a great tasting
egg, and no one gives a second though when it comes to making fried
chicken............
All mind over matter!
Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are
those of my wifes, I had no input whatsoever.
Remove "nospam" from email addy.

Ronny:
And pork brains with scrambled eggs. :-) Haven't had that in years;but
it is delicious!
JMartin
2003-10-14 05:20:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ann
Post by Sam Hopkins
Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my hotdogs,
does
Post by Sam Hopkins
anyone want to answer what the heck is in spam?
Sam
Why not just skip to the "ultimate", scrapple. May not still be the case,
but the labels used to be explicit.
There's some National Geographic thing on talking about people eating goat
fetus'. They are calling it something that sounds like cooti pie. It's
good for back aches and pregnant women.

Ah, educational television. Can't beat it.

Jena
Post by Ann
Post by Sam Hopkins
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a
hotdog?"
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say,
"Beef
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc
of
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Sam Hopkins
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
What's in a hot dog?
Chances are you'll never find anybody who will even *TRY* to
*OFFICIALLY* detail the list for you, if only because most folks are too
squeamish to think about eating certain parts of a dead cow. Simple
economics: You don't sell wieners by telling every person who asks
exactly what bits and pieces go into 'em. Quite bluntly, there are
*VERY* few people out there who actually *REALLY* want to know. They may
*SAY* they want to, but the fact is, they'd really rather go through
life munching down their wieners without ever considering just what kind
of scraps they were made out of, and finding out would, well... "put 'em
off their feed." Their delusion about how hot dogs grow pre-packaged on
wiener-trees would be trashed if they knew the reality, and quite
frankly, most can't accept that. For me personally, "beef is beef" - be
it a slab of prime rib chopped out of the still-twitching carcass I just
put a bullet in 5 minutes ago, a corned brisket, a burger at
Mickey-Dee's, or a Ball Park all-beef wiener. I don't particularly care
where on the cow it came from (although some cuts are, obviously, better
than others for various reasons), I just care that it came from a cow.
Any scraps, trimmings, mis-cuts, bruised meat, and so on that can't
easily be sold "stand-alone", and for whatever reason (texture, color,
strong flavor, whatever) aren't considered useful for hamburger. There
really isn't any such thing as a dedicated "hot dog plant" - hot dogs
are pretty much the "catch all" for any scraps of meat left over at the
end of the overall carcass processing operation. They typically get made
only after after the last of the "suitable to be hamburger" stuff has
been finished.
Hooves? No. Those get sold to the guy who boils them down and makes
"Knox" and Jell-O and Elmer's glue, or to somebody that wants to sell
them as doggy-treats. *AFTER* the meaty contents of the hoof have been
removed and stuffed into the grinder, that is...
Butts? Probably not, (Think "rump roast", "butt steak", etc) but
trimmings from butts, almost certainly.
Lips? Tounge? Ears? Eyeballs? Cheek meat (From a pig, you'd put that in
gelatin, and refer to the resulting block of "mystery meat" as head
cheese)? Necks? Noses? Tails? Almost certainly to all of them except
tounge, which is fairly often sold as a standard beef cut. Outfits that
don't want to (or just plain can't - tounge seems to be something of a
regional taste (no pun intended)) sell it will cheerfully shovel that
into the grinder with all the rest, although it'll more likely be the
hamburger grinder rather than the one they use for wieners. (Never mind
the detail that the wiener grinder is probably also the hamburger
grinder, just set for a much finer grind)
Basically, anything too small, "too disgusting", "esthetically
un-appealing", and so on to be used/sold as a cut of its own is probably
going to end up going into the grinder, right along with anything that
can be boiled/scraped/otherwise removed from the bones.
Then there's the guts... some of which, in the case of "natural casing"
weiners, serve as - You guessed it - the tubes that them little pink
tube-steaks get pumped into.
The age-old chestnut about hot dogs being made of "assholes, lips and
eyeballs" really isn't all *THAT* far wrong...
And don't even get started on pork sausage...
--
SpamAssassinated.
Post by Ann
Post by Sam Hopkins
Post by Don Bruder
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great
info.
Post by Don Bruder
I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart
<http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
Janet Baraclough
2003-10-14 17:24:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by JMartin
There's some National Geographic thing on talking about people eating goat
fetus'. They are calling it something that sounds like cooti pie. It's
good for back aches and pregnant women.
A yummy little entree for trendy pregnant women who plan to eat their
own placenta.

I like birds eggs, fertilised or not, especially fried with black
pudding, (pig blood cooked up with whoknowswhat and stuffed into an
intestine); and haggis, which is a sheeps stomach stuffed with
unrecognisable bits of its anatomy and absolutely delicious.

Not too keen on fish eggs...

Janet
JMartin
2003-10-14 23:05:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by JMartin
There's some National Geographic thing on talking about people eating goat
fetus'. They are calling it something that sounds like cooti pie.
It's
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by JMartin
good for back aches and pregnant women.
A yummy little entree for trendy pregnant women who plan to eat their
own placenta.
I've heard of this. I think if a woman is going to do that, she ought to
just scarf the thing down raw like every other animal.

I hate catching my cows doing this. It's like a big noodle or something,
once they start slurping it down, they can't stop. If I startle them, you
can see the confusion on their faces. "I want to run, but I really, really
gotta' eat this thing first!"

Jena
Post by Janet Baraclough
I like birds eggs, fertilised or not,
I don't care if my eggs are fertilized or not, but I'll skip the rest :)

especially fried with black
Post by Janet Baraclough
pudding, (pig blood cooked up with whoknowswhat and stuffed into an
intestine); and haggis, which is a sheeps stomach stuffed with
unrecognisable bits of its anatomy and absolutely delicious.
Not too keen on fish eggs...
Janet
Sam Hopkins
2003-10-15 15:09:24 UTC
Permalink
I'm getting sicker and sicker as this thread goes on. =)
Post by JMartin
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by JMartin
There's some National Geographic thing on talking about people eating
goat
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by JMartin
fetus'. They are calling it something that sounds like cooti pie.
It's
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by JMartin
good for back aches and pregnant women.
A yummy little entree for trendy pregnant women who plan to eat their
own placenta.
I've heard of this. I think if a woman is going to do that, she ought to
just scarf the thing down raw like every other animal.
I hate catching my cows doing this. It's like a big noodle or something,
once they start slurping it down, they can't stop. If I startle them, you
can see the confusion on their faces. "I want to run, but I really, really
gotta' eat this thing first!"
Jena
Post by Janet Baraclough
I like birds eggs, fertilised or not,
I don't care if my eggs are fertilized or not, but I'll skip the rest :)
especially fried with black
Post by Janet Baraclough
pudding, (pig blood cooked up with whoknowswhat and stuffed into an
intestine); and haggis, which is a sheeps stomach stuffed with
unrecognisable bits of its anatomy and absolutely delicious.
Not too keen on fish eggs...
Janet
Don Bruder
2003-10-15 19:33:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
I'm getting sicker and sicker as this thread goes on. =)
Hey! YOU Started it! :) :)

Bon Apetit! :)
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net <--- Preferred Email - SpamAssassinated.
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great info.
I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart
Fly trap info pages: <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
Fran
2003-10-15 02:44:52 UTC
Permalink
(snip) black
pudding, (pig blood cooked up with whoknowswhat and stuffed into an
intestine);
I finally tried Black pudding when we were over there in June Janet. Yummy
stuff but given that it is an intense flavour I couldn't eat too much of it
at a sitting. Reminded me a bit of Whale meat which I also liked.
Janet Baraclough
2003-10-15 17:08:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fran
(snip) black
pudding, (pig blood cooked up with whoknowswhat and stuffed into an
intestine);
I finally tried Black pudding when we were over there in June Janet. Yummy
stuff but given that it is an intense flavour I couldn't eat too much of it
at a sitting.
I agree. Traditionally you eat BP as part of a mixed grill breakfast
with bacon, sausage eggs etc. It's also good with bubble and squeak, and
there's a cafe here that serves up BP-in-a-roll, which is very good. The
island butcher makes the best black pudding I've ever eaten.
Post by Fran
Reminded me a bit of Whale meat which I also liked.
Haven't tried that

Janet.
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-19 20:22:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet Baraclough
Not too keen on fish eggs...
Yeah, I find the best use for caviar is in salads. Like anchovies, I
prefer to use them as a condiment rather than as a main course. I'm just
not a caviar-on-a-cracker kind of guy.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
Jan Flora
2003-10-20 07:10:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Caldwell
Post by Janet Baraclough
Not too keen on fish eggs...
Yeah, I find the best use for caviar is in salads. Like anchovies, I
prefer to use them as a condiment rather than as a main course. I'm just
not a caviar-on-a-cracker kind of guy.
Mmm. Caviar is *wonderful* if you know how to fix it. I don't, but had a
friend when I was a kid who's Greek mom made caviar that was *sooo* good,
even to a 15 y/o kid.

I like anchovies (bait) when it's rubbed on the salad bowl, then throw away,
for a Ceasar Salad.

Sardines. Bait, IMO. <ick> But some folks love 'em.

Jan

s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 20:13:52 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2003, 5:20am (CDT+5) From:
***@comwares.net (JMartin)
"Ann" <***@epix.net> wrote in message news:LzGib.5362$***@news1.epix.net...
"Sam Hopkins" wrote
Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my hotdogs,
does anyone want to answer what the heck is in spam?
Sam

?
Why not just skip to the "ultimate", scrapple. May not still be the
case, but the labels used to be explicit.

Jena:
There's some National Geographic thing on talking about people eating
goat fetus'. =A0 They are calling it something that sounds like cooti
pie. It's good for back aches and pregnant women.
Ah, educational television. Can't beat it.
Jena

Ronny:
No thank you on that part as my back ain't aching and the last time I
checked I wasn't pregnant! LoL
--------------------
"Don Bruder" <***@sonic.net> wrote in message news:%KDib.31552$***@typhoon.sonic.net...
In article <bmeqob$nto$***@newsfeed.pit.comms.marconi.com>, "Sam Hopkins"
<***@marconi.com> wrote:
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a
hotdog?" There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just
say, "Beef parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts,
noses, etc
of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
What's in a hot dog?
Chances are you'll never find anybody who will even *TRY* to
*OFFICIALLY* detail the list for you, if only because most folks are too
squeamish to think about eating certain parts of a dead cow. Simple
economics: You don't sell wieners by telling every person who asks
exactly what bits and pieces go into 'em. Quite bluntly, there are
*VERY* few people out there who actually *REALLY* want to know. They may
*SAY* they want to, but the fact is, they'd really rather go through
life munching down their wieners without ever considering just what kind
of scraps they were made out of, and finding out would, well... "put 'em
off their feed." Their delusion about how hot dogs grow pre-packaged on
wiener-trees would be trashed if they knew the reality, and quite
frankly, most can't accept that. For me personally, "beef is beef" - be
it a slab of prime rib chopped out of the still-twitching carcass I just
put a bullet in 5 minutes ago, a corned brisket, a burger at
Mickey-Dee's, or a Ball Park all-beef wiener. I don't particularly care
where on the cow it came from (although some cuts are, obviously, better
than others for various reasons), I just care that it came from a cow.
Unofficially, it's pretty easy:
Any scraps, trimmings, mis-cuts, bruised meat, and so on that can't
easily be sold "stand-alone", and for whatever reason (texture, color,
strong flavor, whatever) aren't considered useful for hamburger. There
really isn't any such thing as a dedicated "hot dog plant" - hot dogs
are pretty much the "catch all" for any scraps of meat left over at the
end of the overall carcass processing operation. They typically get made
only after after the last of the "suitable to be hamburger" stuff has
been finished.
Hooves? No. Those get sold to the guy who boils them down and makes
"Knox" and Jell-O and Elmer's glue, or to somebody that wants to sell
them as doggy-treats. *AFTER* the meaty contents of the hoof have been
removed and stuffed into the grinder, that is...
Butts? Probably not, (Think "rump roast", "butt steak", etc) but
trimmings from butts, almost certainly.
Lips? Tounge? Ears? Eyeballs? Cheek meat (From a pig, you'd put that in
gelatin, and refer to the resulting block of "mystery meat" as head
cheese)? Necks? Noses? Tails? Almost certainly to all of them except
tounge, which is fairly often sold as a standard beef cut. Outfits that
don't want to (or just plain can't - tounge seems to be something of a
regional taste (no pun intended)) sell it will cheerfully shovel that
into the grinder with all the rest, although it'll more likely be the
hamburger grinder rather than the one they use for wieners. (Never mind
the detail that the wiener grinder is probably also the hamburger
grinder, just set for a much finer grind)
Basically, anything too small, "too disgusting", "esthetically
un-appealing", and so on to be used/sold as a cut of its own is probably
going to end up going into the grinder, right along with anything that
can be boiled/scraped/otherwise removed from the bones.
Then there's the guts... some of which, in the case of "natural casing"
weiners, serve as - You guessed it - the tubes that them little pink
tube-steaks get pumped into.
The age-old chestnut about hot dogs being made of "assholes, lips and
eyeballs" really isn't all *THAT* far wrong...
And don't even get started on pork sausage...
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net <--- Preferred Email -
SpamAssassinated.
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great
info. I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N.
Peart Fly trap info pages:
<http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
A.T. Hagan
2003-10-14 21:20:24 UTC
Permalink
There's plenty of people who still eat "variety meats" but most of
them won't be regularly posting on the Internet.

Historically it was the poor folks who ate such things and that's
still the case today. There are still plenty of poor people in the
U.S. but they're largely invisible if you rely on the media and the
Internet for your information.

Get out and do a slow cruise through the grocery stores of the small
town Southern U.S. and the poorer areas of the cities then compare and
contrast what you see there with the upscale markets of the suburbs.

I still like liver, but until I start raising my own I won't be eating
much. Same for heart and tongue.

.....Alan.


Post no bills
Janet Baraclough
2003-10-14 22:49:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by A.T. Hagan
There's plenty of people who still eat "variety meats" but most of
them won't be regularly posting on the Internet.
Historically it was the poor folks who ate such things and that's
still the case today. There are still plenty of poor people in the
U.S. but they're largely invisible if you rely on the media and the
Internet for your information.
That's a narrow view; it may be true of the USA, but certainly not in
Europe. What you call variety meat and we call offal is widely eaten by
all social classes; some of it cheap (like tripe) some an expensive
luxury (lambs liver).

Janet
Fran
2003-10-15 02:45:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by A.T. Hagan
There's plenty of people who still eat "variety meats" but most of
them won't be regularly posting on the Internet.
Historically it was the poor folks who ate such things and that's
still the case today. There are still plenty of poor people in the
U.S. but they're largely invisible if you rely on the media and the
Internet for your information.
That's a narrow view; it may be true of the USA, but certainly not in
Europe. What you call variety meat and we call offal is widely eaten by
all social classes; some of it cheap (like tripe) some an expensive
luxury (lambs liver).
Nor is it true of Australia. My husband loves Lambs Fry (lamb liver) and I
have requests from friend when I'm doing dinner parties for vol au vents
stuffed with kidney in port wine sauce (my nmouth is watering as I write
this). Ma in law and husband both choose to book lunches for family get
togehtrs at a restaurant that does brains in garlic so they can order them.
I love pressed lamb tongues.
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-15 03:53:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fran
Nor is it true of Australia. My husband loves Lambs Fry (lamb liver) and I
have requests from friend when I'm doing dinner parties for vol au vents
stuffed with kidney in port wine sauce (my nmouth is watering as I write
this). Ma in law and husband both choose to book lunches for family get
togehtrs at a restaurant that does brains in garlic so they can order them.
I love pressed lamb tongues.
And I have several times relished a plate of snails poached in garlic and
herb butter. I am fortunate enough to live within 15 minutes of a place
that serves great escargot.

I also eat bugs, AKA crustaceans, like lobster, crab and crawdads.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
Fran
2003-10-15 05:22:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Caldwell
Post by Fran
Nor is it true of Australia. My husband loves Lambs Fry (lamb liver)
(snip)
Post by Larry Caldwell
And I have several times relished a plate of snails poached in garlic and
herb butter. I am fortunate enough to live within 15 minutes of a place
that serves great escargot.
EEEW yes! I ahven't had luch but unfortuantley nothing like that int eh
fridge.
Post by Larry Caldwell
I also eat bugs, AKA crustaceans, like lobster, crab and crawdads.
What's a crawdad? A crayfish of some sort?
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-15 11:50:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fran
Post by Larry Caldwell
I also eat bugs, AKA crustaceans, like lobster, crab and crawdads.
What's a crawdad? A crayfish of some sort?
It's a fresh water lobster. They are small but tasty. You just get a
morsel of meat out of each one, but they are so plentiful that the catch
limit is hundreds. A country gourmet meal around here is grilled steak,
corn on the cob and crawdads.

Bugs. Love 'em. Six legs and feelers are the sign of good eating.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
Don Bruder
2003-10-15 12:57:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Caldwell
Post by Fran
Post by Larry Caldwell
I also eat bugs, AKA crustaceans, like lobster, crab and crawdads.
What's a crawdad? A crayfish of some sort?
It's a fresh water lobster. They are small but tasty. You just get a
morsel of meat out of each one, but they are so plentiful that the catch
limit is hundreds. A country gourmet meal around here is grilled steak,
corn on the cob and crawdads.
Bugs. Love 'em. Six legs and feelers are the sign of good eating.
<offers up a plate (No wimpy bowl for this stuff. It's thick enough to
be put on a plate) of north Floridian Cockroach Gumbo>

You were saying something about six legs and feelers? :)
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net <--- Preferred Email - SpamAssassinated.
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great info.
I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart
Fly trap info pages: <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-15 23:23:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
<offers up a plate (No wimpy bowl for this stuff. It's thick enough to
be put on a plate) of north Floridian Cockroach Gumbo>
You were saying something about six legs and feelers? :)
How do they taste?

We don't have cockroaches around here. The first one I ever saw in my
life was about 20 years ago, in Europe. Since then, some cities in
Oregon have developed infestations, but they still haven't moved into the
countryside.

I have never lived in a house that had cockroaches, and when I was in
college I lived in some real dumps.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
AL
2003-10-16 02:40:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Larry Caldwell
Post by Fran
Post by Larry Caldwell
I also eat bugs, AKA crustaceans, like lobster, crab and crawdads.
What's a crawdad? A crayfish of some sort?
It's a fresh water lobster. They are small but tasty. You just get a
morsel of meat out of each one, but they are so plentiful that the catch
limit is hundreds. A country gourmet meal around here is grilled steak,
corn on the cob and crawdads.
Bugs. Love 'em. Six legs and feelers are the sign of good eating.
<offers up a plate (No wimpy bowl for this stuff. It's thick enough to
be put on a plate) of north Floridian Cockroach Gumbo>
You were saying something about six legs and feelers? :)
Best to get the critters *before* they grow legs & feelers, while they
is young & tender...


http://www.xs4all.nl/~jtemp/maaltijd.html


AL
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-16 14:31:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by AL
Best to get the critters *before* they grow legs & feelers, while they
is young & tender...
There ya go. Back to snails again. I have been told that beetle grubs
are big and tasty, but can't say I have ever tried them. Snails are
great, though, and you are right, they are very tender.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
A.T. Hagan
2003-10-16 13:52:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Larry Caldwell
Post by Fran
Post by Larry Caldwell
I also eat bugs, AKA crustaceans, like lobster, crab and crawdads.
What's a crawdad? A crayfish of some sort?
It's a fresh water lobster. They are small but tasty. You just get a
morsel of meat out of each one, but they are so plentiful that the catch
limit is hundreds. A country gourmet meal around here is grilled steak,
corn on the cob and crawdads.
Bugs. Love 'em. Six legs and feelers are the sign of good eating.
<offers up a plate (No wimpy bowl for this stuff. It's thick enough to
be put on a plate) of north Floridian Cockroach Gumbo>
You were saying something about six legs and feelers? :)
Interesting scene in Clavell's "King Rat" where the inmates of the
Japanese prison camp scoop cockroaches out of the latrine holes and
deep fry them in palm oil as an important source of protein.

I'd have to be pretty far gone to even consider it, but when your back
is against the wall you might find they taste pretty good.

.....Alan.


Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.
A.T. Hagan
2003-10-16 13:52:02 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 23:49:25 +0100, Janet Baraclough
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by A.T. Hagan
There's plenty of people who still eat "variety meats" but most of
them won't be regularly posting on the Internet.
Historically it was the poor folks who ate such things and that's
still the case today. There are still plenty of poor people in the
U.S. but they're largely invisible if you rely on the media and the
Internet for your information.
That's a narrow view; it may be true of the USA, but certainly not in
Europe. What you call variety meat and we call offal is widely eaten by
all social classes; some of it cheap (like tripe) some an expensive
luxury (lambs liver).
Janet
I thought I was making it fairly clear I was speaking of the U.S. and
what I said is generally true here in the States. There are some
variety meats that are looked upon as desirable, but for the most part
it's not the case with the rest. Europe is somewhat different because
by and large quite a lot of Europe has experienced real hunger more
recently than the most of the U.S. and from this distance food there
seems to be somewhat more expensive than it is here in the U.S. so
people's tastes will naturally vary.

Variety meats used to be more popular here than they presently are
now, but steadily improving economic conditions, growing awareness of
health, and convenience has slowly been squeezing them out of the
mainstream marketplace. During the Second World War and the rationing
it brought with it they were much more popular then than they are now
and much the same during the Great Depression. But that was nearly
sixty years ago or more. Most of the nation has more or less seen
steadily improving economic conditions and falling food prices so the
popularity of a lot of those variety meats has steadily subsided.
Liver is about the one organ meat that can still be found with any
regularity, at least in the supermarkets that I've been into.

You may find other organ meats, but it's a hit or miss thing. When
you do find something other than liver chances are the clientele of
that market is either generally poor, rural, or some form of ethnic.
If there's an ethnic population in the area naturally the stores will
carry products to cater to their tastes.

.....Alan.


Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-16 15:50:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by A.T. Hagan
Variety meats used to be more popular here than they presently are
now, but steadily improving economic conditions, growing awareness of
health, and convenience has slowly been squeezing them out of the
mainstream marketplace. During the Second World War and the rationing
it brought with it they were much more popular then than they are now
and much the same during the Great Depression. But that was nearly
sixty years ago or more. Most of the nation has more or less seen
steadily improving economic conditions and falling food prices so the
popularity of a lot of those variety meats has steadily subsided.
Liver is about the one organ meat that can still be found with any
regularity, at least in the supermarkets that I've been into.
Health is certainly a concern. My mother had a neighbor where she grew
up who ate a lot of rabbit during the depression, and died of tularemia.
The jack rabbit population in Eastern Oregon will boom for a while, and
the highways are paved with rabbit pancakes. Then disease runs through
them and they vanish for a year or two, then the cycle starts again. If
you plan to eat rabbit, you really have to judge the health of the animal
you eat. Tularemia is one of the most contagious diseases known, so you
don't want to even touch an infected carcass. Of course, cooking makes
the meat safe. The danger is while you are preparing the carcass. I
never see domestic rabbit in the meat case.

You are right, I haven't seen kidney or heart in the market for a long
time. Tongue is more common, because you can corn it, boil it and slice
it for sandwiches, but I imagine most of it does go into hot dogs.

Have you heard? California has banned the sale of horse meat for human
consumption. Those people are flatly weird. Of course, there is no
limit on horse meat for pet food, so Fido and Fifi will still get their
daily hunk of Trigger. They just don't want people eating horse meat.
It was fairly common in the markets around here 30 years ago, but I
haven't seen it lately. The meat is much sweeter than beef, and can be
nice and tender.

I have always been adventurous when it came to menu. Over the years I
have eaten some pretty odd things, and the key has always been the skill
of the chef. Specialty meats can be delicious or gawdawful, depending on
the skill of the cook.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
Ann
2003-10-16 17:55:59 UTC
Permalink
"A.T. Hagan" wrote
<...>
Post by A.T. Hagan
Variety meats used to be more popular here than they presently are
now, but steadily improving economic conditions, growing awareness of
health, and convenience has slowly been squeezing them out of the
mainstream marketplace. During the Second World War and the rationing
it brought with it they were much more popular then than they are now
and much the same during the Great Depression. But that was nearly
sixty years ago or more. Most of the nation has more or less seen
steadily improving economic conditions and falling food prices so the
popularity of a lot of those variety meats has steadily subsided.
Liver is about the one organ meat that can still be found with any
regularity, at least in the supermarkets that I've been into.
You may find other organ meats, but it's a hit or miss thing. When
you do find something other than liver chances are the clientele of
that market is either generally poor, rural, or some form of ethnic.
If there's an ethnic population in the area naturally the stores will
carry products to cater to their tastes.
I wonder if has something to do with organ meats (except liver) not being
very profitable to sell. I live in the NE where there are large chicken
processing plants within ~200 miles. Chicken gizzards and hearts can be
bought in packs at the supermarket. But they're priced so one is better off
buying a fryer if economy is the objective. About the same with turkey, but
more seasonal availability.

But beef comes from goodness how far away + organ meats have a relatively
short shelf life. There is one supermarket chain where I sometimes see
beef/pork heart and/or kidney. The beef is usually priced so it is a
someone better buy than the muscle meat on sale that week ... and the pork
is about even. Imo it's sold as an accomodation to the few customers who
want it ... so they'll pick up other items to/from the meat counter.
Butcher shops are few and far between. Often in urban areas and
specializing in ethnic foods.
AL
2003-10-17 01:47:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ann
<...>
Post by A.T. Hagan
You may find other organ meats, but it's a hit or miss thing. When
you do find something other than liver chances are the clientele of
that market is either generally poor, rural, or some form of ethnic.
If there's an ethnic population in the area naturally the stores will
carry products to cater to their tastes.
I wonder if has something to do with organ meats (except liver) not being
very profitable to sell.
The term organ *meats* strikes me as a contradiction in terms. My
favorite analogy to eating liver is its like eating the oil filter from
your car. The organs (and blood) are just part of the plumbing, filters
and pumps to be fed to the dogs. To me the final and ultimate purpose of
all those organs is to purify the flesh for good eatin'...

:)

AL
The Rock Garden
2003-10-17 02:56:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by AL
The term organ *meats* strikes me as a contradiction in terms. My
favorite analogy to eating liver is its like eating the oil filter from
your car. The organs (and blood) are just part of the plumbing, filters
and pumps to be fed to the dogs. To me the final and ultimate purpose of
all those organs is to purify the flesh for good eatin'...
Yeah, well, how do you feel 'bout kidneys and gonads then? :-)


Skip & Christy Hensler
THE ROCK GARDEN
Newport, WA
http://www.povn.com/rock/
AL
2003-10-18 20:25:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Rock Garden
Post by AL
The term organ *meats* strikes me as a contradiction in terms. My
favorite analogy to eating liver is its like eating the oil filter from
your car. The organs (and blood) are just part of the plumbing, filters
and pumps to be fed to the dogs. To me the final and ultimate purpose of
all those organs is to purify the flesh for good eatin'...
Yeah, well, how do you feel 'bout kidneys and gonads then? :-)
You've got a point I suppose - OFF WITH THEIR GONADS!!!
(and feed them to the dogs)



AL
JMartin
2003-10-14 23:07:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by A.T. Hagan
I still like liver, but until I start raising my own I won't be eating
much. Same for heart and tongue.
Is that because you are concerned about what's in it, or because you can't
find it?

Just wondering.

Jena
Post by A.T. Hagan
.....Alan.
Post no bills
A.T. Hagan
2003-10-16 13:52:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by JMartin
Post by A.T. Hagan
I still like liver, but until I start raising my own I won't be eating
much. Same for heart and tongue.
Is that because you are concerned about what's in it, or because you can't
find it?
Just wondering.
Jena
Liver because I don't trust what might in it from commercial sources.
Heart and tongue because I've never actually prepared them myself and
probably won't before we produce our own. Gainesville is a major
university town with folks from around the world here in sufficient
numbers that the local markets stock a pretty wide variety of things.
I live in the country and shop mostly at rural markets so we have
those offerings as well. I like liver, heart, and tongue right well.
Of all the organ meats I've tried brains is the only one I don't care
for. The texture just doesn't do it for me. Chitlins seems to be one
of those things that really depends on the skill of the cook. I've
had them twice where they were quite good, the other times they were
God awful.

When we do start producing our own we're going to at least try
everything we can find a likely sounding recipe for. Wasteful to just
throw it away after putting so much effort and resources into
producing it.

.....Alan.


Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 23:12:56 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2003, 9:20pm (CDT+5) From:
***@REMOVETHISatlantic.net (A.T.=A0Hagan)
There's plenty of people who still eat "variety meats" but most of them
won't be regularly posting on the Internet.
Historically it was the poor folks who ate such things and that's still
the case today. There are still plenty of poor people in the U.S. but
they're largely invisible if you rely on the media and the Internet for
your information.
Get out and do a slow cruise through the grocery stores of the small
town Southern U.S. and the poorer areas of the cities then compare and
contrast what you see there with the upscale markets of the suburbs.
I still like liver, but until I start raising my own I won't be eating
much. Same for heart and tongue.
....Alan.
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0
Ronny:
Well,you got me described here! :-) Southern,small town,rural poor! :-)
I live in a rural part of NE Texas. You know,the part God made first and
best and then used the leftovers for everything else! LoL (I may catch
it for saying that!) LoL

I don't know how many poor people you will find online? I do know a few
that are online like me with MSNWebTV. I pay $19.95 a month for
unlimited time online and 6 email addys. My first WebTV,that I got
several years ago,cost $99 plus tax at Wal Mart. Something happened to
it and it went out in a few weeks;but WM replaced it with another one.
And that one lasted nearly 5 years. It went out finally and there was no
Circuit City or Best Buy around here to get one at without having to
make a 140 or more round mile trip. That was out;but I did find one in a
local town at a pawn shop for about $45 used,
so I got it and it's been doing good for over a year. :-)

Sometimes I wonder how my $19.95 a month for unlimited time and dial up
phone line connection compares to what computer users on here pay for
the same or similar?

Like I said;I do know a few other poor people who are online and stay at
homes, for various reasons or working poor. Of course,I couldn't be on
here if my Mom and I had to pay rent. So it's great that she and Dad
bought this little 14+ acre place back in the '60's. :-) It's just good
that I can get out this way and meet a lot of people that I never would
meet otherwise and get some info that I would find it hard or impossible
to get otherwise. So this WebTV unit has been a true blessing for me.
:-)
A.T. Hagan
2003-10-16 13:52:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@webtv.net
There's plenty of people who still eat "variety meats" but most of them
won't be regularly posting on the Internet.
<snip>                 
Post by s***@webtv.net
Well,you got me described here! :-) Southern,small town,rural poor! :-)
I live in a rural part of NE Texas. You know,the part God made first and
best and then used the leftovers for everything else! LoL (I may catch
it for saying that!) LoL
I don't know how many poor people you will find online? I do know a few
that are online like me with MSNWebTV. I pay $19.95 a month for
unlimited time online and 6 email addys. My first WebTV,that I got
several years ago,cost $99 plus tax at Wal Mart. Something happened to
it and it went out in a few weeks;but WM replaced it with another one.
And that one lasted nearly 5 years. It went out finally and there was no
Circuit City or Best Buy around here to get one at without having to
make a 140 or more round mile trip. That was out;but I did find one in a
local town at a pawn shop for about $45 used,
so I got it and it's been doing good for over a year. :-)
Sometimes I wonder how my $19.95 a month for unlimited time and dial up
phone line connection compares to what computer users on here pay for
the same or similar?
Like I said;I do know a few other poor people who are online and stay at
homes, for various reasons or working poor. Of course,I couldn't be on
here if my Mom and I had to pay rent. So it's great that she and Dad
bought this little 14+ acre place back in the '60's. :-) It's just good
that I can get out this way and meet a lot of people that I never would
meet otherwise and get some info that I would find it hard or impossible
to get otherwise. So this WebTV unit has been a true blessing for me.
:-)
What you say is true, there is cheap (relatively speaking) net access
to be had, but it's still $20 a month, or even just $10 a month plus
the cost of the computer and its upkeep or at least the TV for WebTV.
Then they either have to have a phone line or a cable TV connection.
But more importantly than that they have to *want* net access. Some
do, many don't.

Even the Census Bureau can't seem to get an accurate count here in the
U.S of how many truly poor people there are so I don't know how one
would go about getting hard data. I can drive around the poorer
quarters of Gainesville and some of the rural parts of mine and the
surrounding counties and look at how they live then look closely at
the markets those folks shop in and contrast them with the more
mainstream markets in town and the suburbs. Poor is relative.

.....Alan.


Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-16 15:35:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by A.T. Hagan
What you say is true, there is cheap (relatively speaking) net access
to be had, but it's still $20 a month, or even just $10 a month plus
the cost of the computer and its upkeep or at least the TV for WebTV.
Then they either have to have a phone line or a cable TV connection.
But more importantly than that they have to *want* net access. Some
do, many don't.
Even the Census Bureau can't seem to get an accurate count here in the
U.S of how many truly poor people there are so I don't know how one
would go about getting hard data. I can drive around the poorer
quarters of Gainesville and some of the rural parts of mine and the
surrounding counties and look at how they live then look closely at
the markets those folks shop in and contrast them with the more
mainstream markets in town and the suburbs. Poor is relative.
Even more important a factor is the 1/3 of the population that is
functionally illiterate. I'm sure that pretty much overlaps with the
portion of the population that is poor, and the overlap is increasing.
The number of jobs available where reading is not necessary has been
steadily shrinking for decades, so illiterate pretty much equates with
unemployed.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
Janet Baraclough
2003-10-16 16:24:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Caldwell
Even more important a factor is the 1/3 of the population that is
functionally illiterate.
Well if that does
ConnieG999
2003-10-14 02:52:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
Well now that we got that answered and I've thrown out all my hotdogs,
Oh, come on now.
You've been eating them for years with no ill effects. There's no reason to
stop now. If you "think" about what you're eating with most animal products,
you'll soon be a vegetarian. Every steak and roast is an animal's muscle. Every
"processed" meat in the deli section is made of pieces/parts. A baked chicken
is the entire body, eviscerated and cleaned.
And just think about what you're eating when you have (gasp) an egg!
No need to suddenly get squeamish about what's in processed meats. They still
taste just as good...and nobody's ever died from eating "beaks and butts." (G)

Connie
*****************************************************
My mind is like a steel...um, whatchamacallit.
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-13 20:58:13 UTC
Permalink
Don,I noted what you said about beef tongue. :-) Now beef tongue or beef
heart is a great tasting meat-very good just boiled with a little salt
and then sliced for sandwiches.
Ronny
Don Bruder
2003-10-13 22:21:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@webtv.net
Don,I noted what you said about beef tongue. :-) Now beef tongue or beef
heart is a great tasting meat-very good just boiled with a little salt
and then sliced for sandwiches.
Ronny
No argument from me... You'll notice I didn't say it was bad. Just
"regional". In the area of Michigan where I grew up, you couldn't find
tounge to save your life unless you went directly to the slaughterhouse,
and even there, they gave you a look that oozed "What kind of bizarre
drugs are YOU on???" as they rang it up for pennies a pound. In Georgia
and Florida, you could hardly avoid it - every grocery store and
mom-n-pop stocked it, or could get it for you within an hour if they
didn't have it already. In Arizona, some stores had it, some didn't. Out
here in the town I'm in in California, we've got four places that do the
"we're a grocery store/butcher-shop" thing. One stocks tounge. Another
can special-order it given 2 days' warning that you want it. The other
two don't stock it and can't/wont' order it. One of them flatly refuses
to order it in, and the other claims that they can't because their
supplier can't/won't get it.

As for heart, you can have it. Quite bluntly, I don't do organ meats.
*ANY* organ meats. From heart to sweetbreads, to liver, or even kidney
pie (How do you cook kidney? You boil the piss out of it! :) ), I simply
can't stand the taste of them. Each has its own distinct flavor of
"GAG!", and an unmistakable smell to it that I just plain can't stand to
put in my mouth. And that applies across the board - beef, pork,
chicken, venison, elk, bear, and all the rest that I've tried. Organ
meats aren't fit to use as dog food, as far as I'm concerned.
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net <--- Preferred Email - SpamAssassinated.
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great info.
I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart
Fly trap info pages: <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 20:02:19 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Mon, Oct 13, 2003, 10:21pm (CDT+5) From:
***@sonic.net (Don=A0Bruder)
In article <11909-3F8B11E5-***@storefull-2276.public.lawson.webtv.net>,
***@webtv.net wrote:
Don,I noted what you said about beef tongue. :-) Now beef tongue or beef
heart is a great tasting meat-very good just boiled with a little salt
and then sliced for sandwiches.
Ronny

Don:
No argument from me... You'll notice I didn't say it was bad. Just
"regional".

Ronny:
Did notice you had good things to say about beef tongue and was glad to
see you did. :-) I just get tickled at other people,like my sister,that
says they would never eat such;but she loves her hot dogs and eats
bologna sandwiches!LoL

Don:
In the area of Michigan where I grew up, you couldn't find tounge to
save your life unless you went directly to the slaughterhouse, and even
there, they gave you a look that oozed "What kind of bizarre drugs are
YOU on???" as they rang it up for pennies a pound.

Ronny:
I think it's great that such attitudes sometimes produces cheap,good
food for people like me that know how good it tastes! LoL

Don:
In Georgia and Florida, you could hardly avoid it - every grocery store
and mom-n-pop stocked it, or could get it for you within an hour if they
didn't have it already.

Ronny:
I think a lot of this difference in attitude and acceptability came from
people being so poor and in that condition no one turns down/wastes what
is good food.

Don:
In Arizona, some stores had it, some didn't. Out here in the town I'm in
in California, we've got four places that do the "we're a grocery
store/butcher-shop" thing. One stocks tounge. Another can special-order
it given 2 days' warning that you want it. The other two don't stock it
and can't/wont' order it. One of them flatly refuses to order it in, and
the other claims that they can't because their supplier can't/won't get
it.

Ronny:
As I understand it a lot of Mexican people were poor and many still are.
So again I suspect that is why beef tongue and such is more widely
available in the SW U.S.

Now this has to do with pork;but applies to beef as well. Poor black
people in the South had a saying about well to do people eating high on
the hog. All that meant was that more well to do people ate what was
considered the best parts of the pig and poorer people could mostly only
afford what was considered the inferiour parts. Yet poorer people,in so
many cultures,have always taken what was considered the least desirable
parts and things and sooner or later many of those things were
considered delicacies by the well to do and rich! LoL

Don:
As for heart, you can have it. Quite bluntly, I don't do organ meats.
*ANY* organ meats. From heart to sweetbreads, to liver, or even kidney
pie (How do you cook kidney? You boil the piss out of it! :) ),

Ronny:
That's a good one! LoL

Don:
I simply can't stand the taste of them. Each has its own distinct flavor
of "GAG!", and an unmistakable smell to it that I just plain can't stand
to put in my mouth. And that applies across the board - beef, pork,
chicken, venison, elk, bear, and all the rest that I've tried. Organ
meats aren't fit to use as dog food, as far as I'm concerned.
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net <---

Ronny:
That's where I'm different from you. :-) I love the taste of strong
tasting meat. Even between white and dark meat chicken,I prefer the dark
because to me it has a better,fuller to me real meat flavor.

I've only gotten to eat venison a little and elk just once. Loved it.
:-)

I always do my shopping for meat at the local groceries;but I sure need
to check out our local slaughtter house that also does custom
slaughering for people who bring their beef and pork in. I might be able
to find beef tongue and heart real cheap there and I wouldn't mind
trying some other things as well;but don't think I could quite go the
kidneys! LoL

I used to love chicken livers. That was something around here that was
real cheap whenI was a kid and young person. I couldn't get enough fried
chicken livers to suit me! LoL But somewhere along the line I got ahold
of some bad ones or more likely ate so many in one setting that I made
myself sick! LoL So I got put off chicken livers for years. But now I'm
back to where I can eat them and like them again. I've been know to just
boil them in some salty water and just put them between bread and with a
little mayo and black pepper. Mmmm good! LoL
Ronny
-----------------
Preferred Email - SpamAssassinated. Hate SPAM? See
<http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great info. I will
choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart Fly trap
info pages: <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
Jan Flora
2003-10-14 23:44:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
Post by s***@webtv.net
Don,I noted what you said about beef tongue. :-) Now beef tongue or beef
heart is a great tasting meat-very good just boiled with a little salt
and then sliced for sandwiches.
Ronny
[...]
Post by Don Bruder
As for heart, you can have it. Quite bluntly, I don't do organ meats.
*ANY* organ meats. From heart to sweetbreads, to liver, or even kidney
pie (How do you cook kidney? You boil the piss out of it! :) ), I simply
can't stand the taste of them. Each has its own distinct flavor of
"GAG!", and an unmistakable smell to it that I just plain can't stand to
put in my mouth. And that applies across the board - beef, pork,
chicken, venison, elk, bear, and all the rest that I've tried. Organ
meats aren't fit to use as dog food, as far as I'm concerned.
So I guess beer-battered calf nuts (Rocky Mountain Oysters) are
out? Mmm. More for us ;-)

I don't eat beef or moose liver, but love caribou liver. Go figure...

Moose heart is good when stuffed with Stovetop Stuffing and
baked. But you have to soak the heart in a bucket of water with
white vinegar splashed in it for a day, before cooking. I don't
know why. That's just how my ex prepares it. (A moose heart
will *fill* a 5 gallon bucket. They're huge!)

Most organ meats have a real fine "grain" to them. When we butcher
steers, if the customer doesn't take the tongue, heart, liver or
other parts, we save them for some elders around here who crave
those foods.

Some of our Russian neighbors ask us to save the steer hooves for
them. They boil them down into a geletain-like soup. They tell me
that it's really good. I'll take their word for it. (!)

Jan
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-15 02:29:49 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2003, 3:44pm (CDT-3) From:
***@xyz.net (Jan=A0Flora)
In article <qzFib.31584$***@typhoon.sonic.net>, Don Bruder
<***@sonic.net> wrote:
In article <11909-3F8B11E5-***@storefull-2276.public.lawson.webtv.net>,
***@webtv.net wrote:
Don,I noted what you said about beef tongue. :-) Now beef tongue or beef
heart is a great tasting meat-very good just boiled with a little salt
and then sliced for sandwiches.
Ronny

=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0[...]
As for heart, you can have it. Quite bluntly, I don't do organ meats.
*ANY* organ meats. From heart to sweetbreads, to liver, or even kidney
pie (How do you cook kidney? You boil the piss out of it! :) ), I simply
can't stand the taste of them. Each has its own distinct flavor of
"GAG!", and an unmistakable smell to it that I just plain can't stand to
put in my mouth. And that applies across the board - beef, pork,
chicken, venison, elk, bear, and all the rest that I've tried. Organ
meats aren't fit to use as dog food, as far as I'm concerned.

Jan:
So I guess beer-battered calf nuts (Rocky Mountain Oysters) are out?
Mmm. More for us ;-)

Ronny:
I couldn't go that unless I didn't know what I was eating. LoL But would
take the beer- especially if it was a Budweiser. LoL Ag teacher thought
he was going to give us hands on learning in HS on castrasting hogs. Not
me he didn't.:-) Only castrated one animal in my whole life and that was
a tomcat. Knew enough after that to know I never intended to do that
again.

Jan:
I don't eat beef or moose liver, but love caribou liver. Go figure...

Ronny:
Can't figure as I've only had beef liver of those three. LoL But it
wouldn't bother me to eat the other two if they were handy.

Jan:
Moose heart is good when stuffed with Stovetop Stuffing and baked. But
you have to soak the heart in a bucket of water with white vinegar
splashed in it for a day, before cooking. I don't know why. That's just
how my ex prepares it. (A moose heart will *fill* a 5 gallon bucket.
They're huge!)

Ronny:
Now that I would like to try cooking. :-) And your ex probably soaked it
in vinegar to get some of the gamey flavor out and or to help tenderize
the meat.

Jan:
Most organ meats have a real fine "grain" to them. When we butcher
steers, if the customer doesn't take the tongue, heart, liver or other
parts, we save them for some elders around here who crave those foods.

Ronny:
Now that good,real good to do. :-) And those are very healthy foods for
older people.

Jan:
Some of our Russian neighbors ask us to save the steer hooves for them.
They boil them down into a geletain-like soup. They tell me that it's
really good. I'll take their word for it. (!)
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0Jan

Ronny:
LoL I will too. That recipe must of been handed down from the poorest of
the poor. Boiling hooves for soup,that's the only thing that makes sense
as to why anyone would of done that to start with.
Fran
2003-10-15 02:44:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jan Flora
Some of our Russian neighbors ask us to save the steer hooves for
them. They boil them down into a geletain-like soup. They tell me
that it's really good. I'll take their word for it. (!)
I guess you don't like pigs trotters either Jan? Yumbo!
Fran
2003-10-15 02:45:05 UTC
Permalink
(snip) (How do you cook kidney? You boil the piss out of it! :)
I can well understand why you don't like it if you boil the piss out of it.
That would be guaranteed to turn it into something disgusting.
Sam Hopkins
2003-10-14 13:12:16 UTC
Permalink
EWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
Post by s***@webtv.net
Don,I noted what you said about beef tongue. :-) Now beef tongue or beef
heart is a great tasting meat-very good just boiled with a little salt
and then sliced for sandwiches.
Ronny
Rich Wellner
2003-10-13 21:05:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
What's in a hot dog?
Chances are you'll never find anybody who will even *TRY* to
*OFFICIALLY* detail the list for you, if only because most folks are too
squeamish to think about eating certain parts of a dead cow. Simple
economics: You don't sell wieners by telling every person who asks
exactly what bits and pieces go into 'em.
That's indeed a big part of it. Another is that the parts vary from
producer to producer.
Post by Don Bruder
Hooves? No. Those get sold to the guy who boils them down and makes
"Knox" and Jell-O and Elmer's glue, or to somebody that wants to sell
them as doggy-treats.
FYI, most gelatin in the U.S. is made from pig skin.

rw2
--
Poliglut.org
Politics from the excellence in blogging think tank
We welcome everyone, no matter how wrong you might be
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-13 20:53:14 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Mon, Oct 13, 2003, 2:34pm (CDT+1) From:
***@marconi.com (Sam=A0Hopkins)
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a
hotdog?" There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just
say, "Beef parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts,
noses, etc of animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog
plant?
Sam

Ronny:
Well,Don pretty well covered it all on hotdogs and what they are made
of! LoL
And I figure you can pretty well find out what's in a hotdog by looking
at the ingredients list on a can or package of viena sausage,Spam,potted
meat,
bologna or dog food. It's all about the same-everything goes in that
can't easily be sold otherwise. About the only thing left out would be
the Mooo,the horn and hooves and the BS. LoL

Now on bologna. :-) Well,I once worked in a small meat packing plant
that made a regional bologna. Every week that company sent out small
trucks to all the little stores around here. They had all kinds of lunch
meat in large packages like you see for slicing in a deli. Of course,
some of that didn't get sold by the end of the week and back it came off
of the truck at the end of the week. I guess it was OK even though the
plastic packages could be a little slimey feeling after sitting in those
trucks all week. So every Friday night one of my jobs was to help clean
that leftover meat packages out of those trucks. Never saw where that
stuff went;but I was told it was part of the bologna mix and was resold
in that form the next week. :-) Don't know if that was true;but I never
bought anymore of that brand of bologna and tried not to think of what
might be in other brands when I ate them! LoL
Ronny
Sam Hopkins
2003-10-14 13:41:51 UTC
Permalink
Well looks like I'll be living in a bologna free household now. =)

<***@webtv.net> wrote in message news:11909-3F8B10BA-***@storefull-2276.public.lawson.webtv.net...
Group: misc.rural Date: Mon, Oct 13, 2003, 2:34pm (CDT+1) From:
***@marconi.com (Sam Hopkins)
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a
hotdog?" There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just
say, "Beef parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts,
noses, etc of animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog
plant?
Sam

Ronny:
Well,Don pretty well covered it all on hotdogs and what they are made
of! LoL
And I figure you can pretty well find out what's in a hotdog by looking
at the ingredients list on a can or package of viena sausage,Spam,potted
meat,
bologna or dog food. It's all about the same-everything goes in that
can't easily be sold otherwise. About the only thing left out would be
the Mooo,the horn and hooves and the BS. LoL

Now on bologna. :-) Well,I once worked in a small meat packing plant
that made a regional bologna. Every week that company sent out small
trucks to all the little stores around here. They had all kinds of lunch
meat in large packages like you see for slicing in a deli. Of course,
some of that didn't get sold by the end of the week and back it came off
of the truck at the end of the week. I guess it was OK even though the
plastic packages could be a little slimey feeling after sitting in those
trucks all week. So every Friday night one of my jobs was to help clean
that leftover meat packages out of those trucks. Never saw where that
stuff went;but I was told it was part of the bologna mix and was resold
in that form the next week. :-) Don't know if that was true;but I never
bought anymore of that brand of bologna and tried not to think of what
might be in other brands when I ate them! LoL
Ronny
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 19:24:21 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2003, 9:41am (CDT+1) From:
***@marconi.com (Sam=A0Hopkins)
Well looks like I'll be living in a bologna free household now. =3D)

Ronny:
Well,I guess this means I really shouldn't tell you about what happens
in a chicken factory when those machines pluck those chickens! LoL We
keep this up and we're all gonna make a vegeterian out of of you!LoL

But now ya gotta admit that fresh unprocessed beef tongue and heart is
obviously more healthy for a person than than this processed food like
hot dogs and bologna,etc. :-) And it does taste good. :-) But one of my
sisters and her husband go Eeeeew too at the thought of eating beef
tongue and heart :-) and they even have their own farm raised beef that
they have slaughtered locally! But then I profit from their
squeamishness by getting those good parts they can't stand the thought
of eating! LoL
------------------------
<***@webtv.net> wrote in message news:11909-3F8B10BA-***@storefull-2276.public.lawson.webtv.net... Group:
misc.rural Date: Mon, Oct 13, 2003, 2:34pm (CDT+1) From:
***@marconi.com (Sam Hopkins) So I've searched forever and
ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?" There doesn't seem to be
anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef parts." You always
hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of animals. Is this
true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
Ronny:
Well,Don pretty well covered it all on hotdogs and what they are made
of! LoL
And I figure you can pretty well find out what's in a hotdog by looking
at the ingredients list on a can or package of viena sausage,Spam,potted
meat,
bologna or dog food. It's all about the same-everything goes in that
can't easily be sold otherwise. About the only thing left out would be
the Mooo,the horn and hooves and the BS. LoL
Now on bologna. :-) Well,I once worked in a small meat packing plant
that made a regional bologna. Every week that company sent out small
trucks to all the little stores around here. They had all kinds of lunch
meat in large packages like you see for slicing in a deli. Of course,
some of that didn't get sold by the end of the week and back it came off
of the truck at the end of the week. I guess it was OK even though the
plastic packages could be a little slimey feeling after sitting in those
trucks all week. So every Friday night one of my jobs was to help clean
that leftover meat packages out of those trucks. Never saw where that
stuff went;but I was told it was part of the bologna mix and was resold
in that form the next week. :-) Don't know if that was true;but I never
bought anymore of that brand of bologna and tried not to think of what
might be in other brands when I ate them! LoL Ronny
JMartin
2003-10-14 19:49:06 UTC
Permalink
<***@webtv.net> wrote in message news:25450-3F8C4D65-***@storefull-2277.public.lawson.webtv.net...
But one of my
sisters and her husband go Eeeeew too at the thought of eating beef
tongue and heart :-)

I don't think I could eat one of my cow's hearts. It just seems
so.....heartless.

Jena


and they even have their own farm raised beef that
they have slaughtered locally! But then I profit from their
squeamishness by getting those good parts they can't stand the thought
of eating! LoL
------------------------
<***@webtv.net> wrote in message news:11909-3F8B10BA-***@storefull-2276.public.lawson.webtv.net... Group:
misc.rural Date: Mon, Oct 13, 2003, 2:34pm (CDT+1) From:
***@marconi.com (Sam Hopkins) So I've searched forever and
ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?" There doesn't seem to be
anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef parts." You always
hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of animals. Is this
true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
Ronny:
Well,Don pretty well covered it all on hotdogs and what they are made
of! LoL
And I figure you can pretty well find out what's in a hotdog by looking
at the ingredients list on a can or package of viena sausage,Spam,potted
meat,
bologna or dog food. It's all about the same-everything goes in that
can't easily be sold otherwise. About the only thing left out would be
the Mooo,the horn and hooves and the BS. LoL
Now on bologna. :-) Well,I once worked in a small meat packing plant
that made a regional bologna. Every week that company sent out small
trucks to all the little stores around here. They had all kinds of lunch
meat in large packages like you see for slicing in a deli. Of course,
some of that didn't get sold by the end of the week and back it came off
of the truck at the end of the week. I guess it was OK even though the
plastic packages could be a little slimey feeling after sitting in those
trucks all week. So every Friday night one of my jobs was to help clean
that leftover meat packages out of those trucks. Never saw where that
stuff went;but I was told it was part of the bologna mix and was resold
in that form the next week. :-) Don't know if that was true;but I never
bought anymore of that brand of bologna and tried not to think of what
might be in other brands when I ate them! LoL Ronny
Gary Coffman
2003-10-14 22:19:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by JMartin
I don't think I could eat one of my cow's hearts. It just seems
so.....heartless.
Naw, just chewy.

My favorite organ meat is hog liver. Nice and bitter.
(I like bitter.) Cow liver is too bland for me, though
I will eat it if it is smothered in onions.

My uncle just loved brains and scrambled eggs.
I couldn't stomach it. But he couldn't stand liver,
so we got along great at hog killing time.

Gary
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-15 04:11:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary Coffman
Post by JMartin
I don't think I could eat one of my cow's hearts. It just seems
so.....heartless.
Naw, just chewy.
Isn't that the truth! Heart is one solid muscle. The best thing to do
is shove it through a meat grinder and use it to make hot dogs.

My brother-in-law butchered two cows last summer, and gave me both
livers. He didn't want them. Good liver. I made liverwurst and liver
pate out of them. If you think hot dogs are rich, try home made
liverwurst sometime. The recipe I ran across used butter.

The secret to good tasting liver is to soak the blood out of the meat.
Liver is full of blood. If you marinade it in cheap red wine, the blood
will soak out of the meat. Some people use milk, but I think wine works
a lot better.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-13 22:58:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
You buy those beef franks, huh? The ingredients on my hot dogs (good old
Bar S Jumbo Franks) say chicken, pork and beef in that order. They also
contain phosphates, lactates, salt and nitrites. One 55 gram dog
contains 15 grams of fat, 5 grams of protein and 680 mg of sodium. Out
of 170 calories, 130 calories are from fat.

Does that give you a hint what is in them? Mostly fat, a little meat for
color, and a lot of salt.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
r***@yahoo.com
2003-10-13 23:26:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
I worked at Swifts in Honolulu while attending UH in the early 60's.
The machine capacity for any one run was 300 lbs.. which consisted of
at least 150 lbs of trimmings which is mostly fat maybe 50 to 100 lbs
of bull flesh and roughly 50 lbs of heart or what else was at hand. A
bag of chemicals, the composition of which i wasn't privy too also
went in. I enjoyed making Portuguese Sausage which is popular in
Hawaii, since my taste runs towards thing spicy i doubled the chili
content in hopes i might come across it in a store
Cheers Ed
JMartin
2003-10-13 23:26:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Here's a little bit more than you probably wanted to know about where that
meat comes from.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/focushotdog.htm

I know that recently there has been discussion (don't know if there's any
new regulation on the MSM due to mad cow).

The good part is that it says it has to be "skeletal muscle" meat unless it
says "by-products", then it can have organs in it.

There is a SPAM museum.....

http://media.hormel.com/anm/templates/spam_museum.asp?articleid=8&zoneid=11

Not on my list of "places to visit".

Jena
Post by Sam Hopkins
Sam
Janet Baraclough
2003-10-13 20:34:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true?
Not entirely; you missed out udders and intestines :-) Try
websearching for "reconstituted meat" or "processed meat products".

Janet
Bob Adkins
2003-10-14 17:03:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet Baraclough
Not entirely; you missed out udders and intestines :-) Try
websearching for "reconstituted meat" or "processed meat products".
Oh man, I quit eating hot dogs. It'll be strictly vienna sausage from now
on.

Bob
Don Bruder
2003-10-14 18:26:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Adkins
Post by Janet Baraclough
Not entirely; you missed out udders and intestines :-) Try
websearching for "reconstituted meat" or "processed meat products".
Oh man, I quit eating hot dogs. It'll be strictly vienna sausage from now
on.
Bob
Seeing as those are nothing more or less than hot dogs with a minor
diddle in the spices that get added, it won't do ya any good...
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net <--- Preferred Email - SpamAssassinated.
Hate SPAM? See <http://www.spamassassin.org> for some seriously great info.
I will choose a path that's clear: I will choose Free Will! - N. Peart
Fly trap info pages: <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/Horses/FlyTrap/index.html>
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 19:13:36 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2003, 12:03pm From:
***@charter.net (Bob=A0Adkins)

=A0=A0=A0=A0Not entirely; you missed out udders and intestines :-) Try
websearching for "reconstituted meat" or "processed meat products".

Bob:
Oh man, I quit eating hot dogs. It'll be strictly vienna sausage from
now on.
Bob

Ronny:
Uh Bob. You don't want to read the list of ingredients on that can of
vienna sausage!LoL And the same for potted meat. :-) I love both;but I'm
sure both have way too much fat in them to be healthy for a person.:-(

When I was younger I would take potted meat sandwiches and a can or so
of vienna saugage and crackers to eat at my work lunch break. Bothered
me to no end that I had a young niece and nephew that would come over
often and eat all of that up. I didn't mind them eating here;but I would
get up the next morning and have nothing to take to work for a sandwich!
So I solved that little problem one day when niece and nephew came over.
I just had them read the list of ingridients on a can of vienna
sausage,etc and I explained to then what some of those meats were. :-)
You know they never bothered uncle's vienna sausage or potted meat
again-for some reason? LoL
Bob Adkins
2003-10-15 13:25:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@webtv.net
Uh Bob. You don't want to read the list of ingredients on that can of
I read all those labels years ago. I avoid reading labels now. I just don't
need to know how many insect parts and cow lips are in my food.

Bob
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-15 15:19:40 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Wed, Oct 15, 2003, 8:25am From:
***@charter.net (Bob=A0Adkins)
On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 14:13:36 -0500 (CDT), ***@webtv.net wrote:
Uh Bob. You don't want to read the list of ingredients on that can of

Bob:
I read all those labels years ago. I avoid reading labels now. I just
don't need to know how many insect parts and cow lips are in my food.
Bob

Ronny:
Cow lips and such don't bother me in things like canned meats. What
bothers me now,as I've gotten older,is the way too much fat that is in
such. It doesn't digest sometimes as good as it once did and I end up
needing an Alka Seltzer;but then that can be true of many fats for me.

About insects; :-) grasshoppers are pretty good. Not bad at all breaded
and fried and dipped in a nice hot sauce.
Jonathan Ball
2003-10-15 15:29:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@webtv.net
Uh Bob. You don't want to read the list of ingredients on that can of
I read all those labels years ago. I avoid reading labels now. I just
don't need to know how many insect parts and cow lips are in my food.
Bob
Cow lips and such don't bother me in things like canned meats. What
bothers me now,as I've gotten older,is the way too much fat that is in
such. It doesn't digest sometimes as good as it once did and I end up
needing an Alka Seltzer;but then that can be true of many fats for me.
Exactly right. Trader Joe's sells quite a lot of
really good sausages. It isn't the parts that are
mentioned in the ingredients lists that put me off
them, it's the fat content. Some of these sausage
packages indicate one sausage as a serving size (who
the heck is going to eat just ONE sausage?!), and a
single sausage sometimes provides over 40% of the
recommended daily intake of saturated fat, and often
over 30% of the recommended total fat.

Fat content is about the only thing I look at on
ingredients lists.
Post by s***@webtv.net
About insects; :-) grasshoppers are pretty good. Not bad at all breaded
and fried and dipped in a nice hot sauce.
Jonathan Ball
2003-10-14 17:18:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true?
Not entirely; you missed out udders and intestines :-) Try
websearching for "reconstituted meat" or "processed meat products".
No source for your udders and intestines claim, of
course. It is contradicted by the link JMartin
provided to the USDA site that defines what's in a hot
dog: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/focushotdog.htm

If an American hot dog contains udders and intestines,
it will say so on the package.

The responses of the Americans in this thread largely
confirm their reputation as being exceptionally
squeamish about food. When I lived in Germany in the
mid 1980s, a German friend who ate heart and lungs at
an excellent German restaurant in town (Das Herrenhaus,
in Wasserburg am Inn, Bayern) remarked that up until
about a century ago, most Americans ate them, too.

The prominence of organ meat, or what is
euphemistically called "variety meat" in America, in a
country's diet is usually a reflection on the place
having once been food-poor. Until the Industrial
Revolution, Great Britain was a food-poor nation,
particulary Scotland. In food-poor places, you don't
waste something that provides nutrition, no matter how
unappetizing it looks by later standards. Thus, haggis.

Anyone living in the Pennsylvania area, look at the
ingredients list on a package of scrapple. In the
southwest, check the ingredients in chorizo. Both of
them are delicious and nutritious, although a little
high in fat.
Tony (aqk)
2003-10-14 19:13:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Ball
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true?
Not entirely; you missed out udders and intestines :-) Try
websearching for "reconstituted meat" or "processed meat products".
No source for your udders and intestines claim, of
course. It is contradicted by the link JMartin
provided to the USDA site that defines what's in a hot
dog: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/focushotdog.htm
If an American hot dog contains udders and intestines,
it will say so on the package.
The responses of the Americans in this thread largely
confirm their reputation as being exceptionally
squeamish about food. When I lived in Germany in the
mid 1980s, a German friend who ate heart and lungs at
an excellent German restaurant in town (Das Herrenhaus,
in Wasserburg am Inn, Bayern) remarked that up until
about a century ago, most Americans ate them, too.
The prominence of organ meat, or what is
euphemistically called "variety meat" in America, in a
country's diet is usually a reflection on the place
having once been food-poor. Until the Industrial
Revolution, Great Britain was a food-poor nation,
particulary Scotland. In food-poor places, you don't
waste something that provides nutrition, no matter how
unappetizing it looks by later standards. Thus, haggis.
Anyone living in the Pennsylvania area, look at the
ingredients list on a package of scrapple. In the
southwest, check the ingredients in chorizo. Both of
them are delicious and nutritious, although a little
high in fat.
In Montreal, 35 yr or so ago, there used to be several Eastern European restaurants,
(run by refugees from the Hungarian revolution presumably) that served a $1.99
special of the day.
Initially something like weinerschnitzel, the special gradually got more, umm... "exotic"
as they tried to keep the price at $1.99.
Eventually, the Tuesday special served was lung stew, or perhaps breaded cows brains.
As a student without much $$, I tried these once, but had to bite the financial bullet and
thereafter opt for the higher priced 'regular' meal.
As well, tripe was frequently a cheap item. Now, I sometimes see it as a high-priced
(over-priced!) delicacy.
Jonathan Ball
2003-10-14 19:43:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony (aqk)
Post by Jonathan Ball
Post by Janet Baraclough
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true?
Not entirely; you missed out udders and intestines :-) Try
websearching for "reconstituted meat" or "processed meat products".
No source for your udders and intestines claim, of
course. It is contradicted by the link JMartin
provided to the USDA site that defines what's in a hot
dog: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/focushotdog.htm
If an American hot dog contains udders and intestines,
it will say so on the package.
The responses of the Americans in this thread largely
confirm their reputation as being exceptionally
squeamish about food. When I lived in Germany in the
mid 1980s, a German friend who ate heart and lungs at
an excellent German restaurant in town (Das Herrenhaus,
in Wasserburg am Inn, Bayern) remarked that up until
about a century ago, most Americans ate them, too.
The prominence of organ meat, or what is
euphemistically called "variety meat" in America, in a
country's diet is usually a reflection on the place
having once been food-poor. Until the Industrial
Revolution, Great Britain was a food-poor nation,
particulary Scotland. In food-poor places, you don't
waste something that provides nutrition, no matter how
unappetizing it looks by later standards. Thus, haggis.
Anyone living in the Pennsylvania area, look at the
ingredients list on a package of scrapple. In the
southwest, check the ingredients in chorizo. Both of
them are delicious and nutritious, although a little
high in fat.
In Montreal, 35 yr or so ago, there used to be several Eastern European restaurants,
(run by refugees from the Hungarian revolution presumably) that served a $1.99
special of the day.
Initially something like weinerschnitzel, the special gradually got more, umm... "exotic"
as they tried to keep the price at $1.99.
Eventually, the Tuesday special served was lung stew, or perhaps breaded cows brains.
As a student without much $$, I tried these once, but had to bite the financial bullet and
thereafter opt for the higher priced 'regular' meal.
As well, tripe was frequently a cheap item. Now, I sometimes see it as a high-priced
(over-priced!) delicacy.
You have a definite point about the high price of what
once was considered junk meat. When "organs" get
relabeled "sweetbreads", expect to pay big $$$.

One time, in a brasserie in Geneva, Switzerland, some
Swiss friends of mine both ordered a lamb's brain as
their appetizer. It arrived on a little piece of
toast, a brain about the size of a small fist,
garnished with some greenery. They figured I was the
typical queasy-stomached American, and dared me to try
a bite. I ate a bite, and thought the thing was pretty
bland, with a slightly unpleasant texture. I could eat
it if I had to.

Earlier, when I lived in Switzerland, the family I
lived with introduced me to tripe. The first time, it
was cooked as some kind of stew in a tomato base. I
thought it smelled great, but that was all the stuff
surrounding it. The tripe itself tasted terrible.
Some time later, the mother in the family made it
again, this time just boiled and served with home made
mayonnaise. I tried it again, and thought it was not bad.

Later, in Germany, I ate often at a (more or less)
Italian place, where we got to know the chef/owner. He
served some tripe dishes that I thought were great.

Did you ever eat "viande fumée" at Schwartz's
delicatessen in Montreal? (Before the squeamish
monolingual Americans in the newsgroup get too excited,
"viande fumée" just means "smoked meat", i.e. pastrami.)
Tony (aqk)
2003-10-15 13:57:12 UTC
Permalink
((((snip))))
Post by Jonathan Ball
Did you ever eat "viande fumée" at Schwartz's
delicatessen in Montreal? (Before the squeamish
monolingual Americans in the newsgroup get too excited,
"viande fumée" just means "smoked meat", i.e. pastrami.)
It's SMOKED MEAT! Even the majority of French people in Montreal call it that.
There's always a big rivalry / argument as to which is better- Montreal smoked wheat
or New York Pastrami.
Most people who have eaten both seem to prefer the Montreal variety.
Of course if you asked a New Yorker which he preferred, he'd most likely admit
he'd never heard of Mtl smoked meat. And some indeed have probably never even
heard of Montreal.
I used to eat frequently at Schwartz's when I lived in Montreal 25 years ago.
Since moving to the rural .misc 55 miles out, I only get into Montreal 3 or 4 times a year,
and am ashamed to say I haven't eaten at Schwartz's in 20 years. But it's still
apparently the same single delicatessen, having resisted all attempts at franchising.
... Just to keep this Hot-Dog thread on track: For a while there was a half-hearted
attempt in Quebec to call a hotdog "un chien chaud". But if you're ever in Quebec, just
order a 'otte dogue steamé...
-Tony

BTW for any vegetarians lurking in misc.rural (are sprout-heads permitted here?) a friend of mine
produces a passable all-veggie smoked imitation-meat. I have some in my freezer now,
lying beside the venison steaks and home-grown chickens.
Check his website: http://www.smokedwheat.com "All the flavour, none of the meat"
If you're brave enough to order any, tell 'em Tony sent you!
JMartin
2003-10-14 19:47:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony (aqk)
As well, tripe was frequently a cheap item. Now, I sometimes see it as a high-priced
(over-priced!) delicacy.
In California, the regular supermarket carried tripe. I don't remember, but
it was pretty cheap. I was always told that the Mexican-Americans ate it.
I'm not sure, but I think they use it to make chorizo. I wouldn't be able
to find a package of chorizo around here to check.

Jena
Jonathan Ball
2003-10-14 19:56:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony (aqk)
Post by Tony (aqk)
As well, tripe was frequently a cheap item. Now, I sometimes see it as a
high-priced
Post by Tony (aqk)
(over-priced!) delicacy.
In California, the regular supermarket carried tripe. I don't remember, but
it was pretty cheap. I was always told that the Mexican-Americans ate it.
I'm not sure, but I think they use it to make chorizo.
No. It's the main ingredient in menudo, which is tripe
soup.
Post by Tony (aqk)
I wouldn't be able
to find a package of chorizo around here to check.
That's the sterile, whitebread heartland for you.
Bill Vajk
2003-10-14 20:20:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Ball
Post by JMartin
I wouldn't be able
to find a package of chorizo around here to check.
That's the sterile, whitebread heartland for you.
I was unable to find buttermilk in a fair sized city in
the English midlands. It has to do with local discretionary
funds available and local tastes.

In the early 1970's I was unable to buy real maple syrup
in several southern cities, even where money for such
was available. Preferences for products like sorghum
syrup, molasas, and plain white Karo syrup seemed to
prevail. One local A&P manager told me he'd ordered a
case of maple syrup once and ended up throwing away
all but one bottle year later. He'd order a case for
me if I prepaid the retail price for 24 bottles.
A.T. Hagan
2003-10-14 21:15:28 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 20:20:08 GMT, Bill Vajk
Post by Bill Vajk
In the early 1970's I was unable to buy real maple syrup
in several southern cities, even where money for such
was available. Preferences for products like sorghum
syrup, molasas, and plain white Karo syrup seemed to
prevail. One local A&P manager told me he'd ordered a
case of maple syrup once and ended up throwing away
all but one bottle year later. He'd order a case for
me if I prepaid the retail price for 24 bottles.
I can tell you now in every Southern city I've been in for as long as
I can remember you can find at least one brand of real maple syrup,
often two or three. What you can't find is real cane syrup, not
molasses, but cane syrup. Can't recall when last I saw a bottle of
sorghum syrup either, but it's more popular in the Upper South anyway.

I have to hoard my syrup carefully because I never know when I'm going
to find more.

.....Alan.


Post no bills
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 22:31:26 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2003, 9:15pm (CDT+5) From:
***@REMOVETHISatlantic.net (A.T.=A0Hagan)
On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 20:20:08 GMT, Bill Vajk
<***@hotmail.DITCHTHIS.com> wrote:
In the early 1970's I was unable to buy real maple syrup in several
southern cities, even where money for such was available. Preferences
for products like sorghum syrup, molasas, and plain white Karo syrup
seemed to prevail. One local A&P manager told me he'd ordered a case of
maple syrup once and ended up throwing away all but one bottle year
later. He'd order a case for me if I prepaid the retail price for 24
bottles.

Alan:
I can tell you now in every Southern city I've been in for as long as I
can remember you can find at least one brand of real maple syrup, often
two or three. What you can't find is real cane syrup, not molasses, but
cane syrup. Can't recall when last I saw a bottle of sorghum syrup
either, but it's more popular in the Upper South anyway.
I have to hoard my syrup carefully because I never know when I'm going
to find more.
....Alan.

Ronny:
Alan,if you've got a Wal Mart handy try there for Steen's 100% Pure Cane
Syrup. If your store has it,it will be with the rest of the syrup and
comes in a yellow can with black lettering. Also think they had it in a
bottle. And the ingredient list says;only pure sugarcane juice slow
simmered in open kettles. No additives,
preservatives or anything else added.

What I hate is that it isn't always available;but I've finding it at my
Wal Mart Super Center store this time of year. I love it with real
homemade biscuits with real butter melted in those. Mmmm! LoL
A.T. Hagan
2003-10-16 13:52:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@webtv.net
Alan,if you've got a Wal Mart handy try there for Steen's 100% Pure Cane
Syrup. If your store has it,it will be with the rest of the syrup and
comes in a yellow can with black lettering. Also think they had it in a
bottle. And the ingredient list says;only pure sugarcane juice slow
simmered in open kettles. No additives,
preservatives or anything else added.
What I hate is that it isn't always available;but I've finding it at my
Wal Mart Super Center store this time of year. I love it with real
homemade biscuits with real butter melted in those. Mmmm! LoL
Years ago I found Steens in our local Albertson's, but have never seen
it since. Any time I go into a market that I haven't been into a
while checking out their syrup selection is one of those things I do
out of habit. The Super Wal Mart doesn't, nor the Sam's Club, not the
local regular Wal Marts, Albertson's, Publix, Kash & Karry, heck even
the area Winn Dixies and IGA's don't have any.

Mostly I think this is because good cane syrup is expensive to produce
both in terms of labor and energy to boil it down. Maple syrup is
even worse of course, but it has a lot larger following of folks
who'll pay big prices for syrup. Steens is OK, but it's not very high
up on the scale of decent syrup. Fortunately, we've got enough
'living history' kind of things going on around here that I usually
pick up another bottle or two before I run out. The last batch I came
across they sold every bottle before the dang things had even cooled
enough to be held!

One of these days I'm just going to up and buy my own cane mill and
make my own.

.....Alan.


Curiosity killed the cat -
lack of it is killing mankind.
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 22:41:59 UTC
Permalink
Alan here's you a webpage link for Steen's 100% Pure Cane Syrup.
http://www.steensyrup.com/ Hope you have a Wal Mart or someplace else to
find it though because it is cheaper at Wal Mart than on this site.
Larry Caldwell
2003-10-15 04:11:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by A.T. Hagan
I can tell you now in every Southern city I've been in for as long as
I can remember you can find at least one brand of real maple syrup,
often two or three. What you can't find is real cane syrup, not
molasses, but cane syrup. Can't recall when last I saw a bottle of
sorghum syrup either, but it's more popular in the Upper South anyway.
I have a jar of sorghum syrup in the pantry. I can't remember where I
got it. I keep a variety of sugars around, dark and light karo, dark and
light molasses, honey, maple and cane, plus the arcane sweetener that
comes packaged as Mrs. Butterworth's.

Different sugars give cookies and such a different taste. With the
holidays coming up, I guess I need to start baking again. Mmm. Pecan
pie.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
Bob Adkins
2003-10-15 13:33:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by A.T. Hagan
often two or three. What you can't find is real cane syrup, not
molasses, but cane syrup. Can't recall when last I saw a bottle of
We used to grow ribbon cane when I was a kid. We cut it by hand, a mule
walked in a circle on a long pole and drove a rolling mill to crush it. The
juice was collected in a big square vat, and a fire built under it. As the
juiced boiled down and became sweet, we would stick a joint of sugar cane
into the syrup and lick it. Man, there's nothing like that on home made
biscuits and butter. I guess its still made locally. I bet you could find
some driving through TN and KY.

Bob
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 20:22:42 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2003, 3:13pm (CDT+1) From:
***@infoaqk.zdeletez.com (Tony=A0(aqk))
"Jonathan Ball" <***@whitehouse.not> wrote in message news:7eWib.1165$***@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
Janet Baraclough wrote:
The message <bmeqob$nto$***@newsfeed.pit.comms.marconi.com> from "Sam
Hopkins" <***@marconi.com> contains these words:
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a
hotdog?" There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just
say, "Beef parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts,
noses, etc of animals. Is this true?

JB:
=A0=A0=A0=A0Not entirely; you missed out udders and intestines :-) Try
websearching for "reconstituted meat" or "processed meat products".

Tony:
No source for your udders and intestines claim, of course. It is
contradicted by the link JMartin provided to the USDA site that defines
what's in a hot dog: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/focushotdog.htm
If an American hot dog contains udders and intestines, it will say so on
the package.

Ronny:
But you know it wouldn't really hurt a thing if those parts were in hot
dogs and such. The only need would be to see that such parts were from
healthy animals and processed clean.
-------------
JB:
The responses of the Americans in this thread largely confirm their
reputation as being exceptionally squeamish about food. When I lived in
Germany in the mid 1980s, a German friend who ate heart and lungs at an
excellent German restaurant in town (Das Herrenhaus, in Wasserburg am
Inn, Bayern) remarked that up until about a century ago, most Americans
ate them, too.
The prominence of organ meat, or what is euphemistically called "variety
meat" in America, in a country's diet is usually a reflection on the
place having once been food-poor. Until the Industrial Revolution, Great
Britain was a food-poor nation, particulary Scotland. In food-poor
places, you don't waste something that provides nutrition, no matter how
unappetizing it looks by later standards. Thus, haggis.
Anyone living in the Pennsylvania area, look at the ingredients list on
a package of scrapple. In the southwest, check the ingredients in
chorizo. Both of them are delicious and nutritious, although a little
high in fat.
In Montreal, 35 yr or so ago, there used to be several Eastern European
restaurants, (run by refugees from the Hungarian revolution presumably)
that served a $1.99
=A0=A0special of the day.
=A0=A0Initially something like weinerschnitzel, the special gradually
got more, umm... "exotic"
as they tried to keep the price at $1.99.
=A0=A0=A0=A0Eventually, the Tuesday special served was lung stew, or
perhaps breaded cows brains. As a student without much $$, I tried these
once, but had to bite the financial bullet and thereafter opt for the
higher priced 'regular' meal. As well, tripe was frequently a cheap
item. Now, I sometimes see it as a high-priced
(over-priced!) delicacy.
charles krin
2003-10-14 20:11:35 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 14:34:36 -0400, "Sam Hopkins"
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
ummm...was it Twain or Johnson who first said, "People who love the
law and sausage should never watch either of them made..."

or should I refer to Pterry's "Cut me own throat Dibbler" and his
infamous 'mystery meat' hot sausage on a stick?

Frankfurters and Vienna 'Wienies' are nothing more or less than
sausage ground fine...

c
--
The Ten Commandments display was removed from the Alabama Supreme Court
building, But here was a good reason for the move. 

You can't post "Thou Shalt Not Steal" in a building full of lawyers and
politicians without creating a hostile work environment.

Edna H. on alt.books.m-lackey, 20030930
The Rock Garden
2003-10-14 20:54:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles krin
ummm...was it Twain or Johnson who first said, "People who love the
law and sausage should never watch either of them made..."
Otto Von Bismark. :-)

Skip


Skip & Christy Hensler
THE ROCK GARDEN
Newport, WA
http://www.povn.com/rock/
Bob Adkins
2003-10-15 18:47:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles krin
On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 14:34:36 -0400, "Sam Hopkins"
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
ummm...was it Twain or Johnson who first said, "People who love the
law and sausage should never watch either of them made..."
or should I refer to Pterry's "Cut me own throat Dibbler" and his
infamous 'mystery meat' hot sausage on a stick?
Frankfurters and Vienna 'Wienies' are nothing more or less than
sausage ground fine...
Well, the world needs to meet Cajun sausage.

Made just like you and I would make it at home. No mystery meat, no finely
ground bones, wood, or miscellaneous parts or chemicals added.

Lean beef or pork (both for the "mixed"), spices, and smoked until it's
fairly dry. It's almost literally "tube steak".

Bob
_jj_
2003-10-14 21:52:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Hopkins
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a hotdog?"
There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just say, "Beef
parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts, noses, etc of
animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog plant?
Sam
I tease my 11 year old - who has a taste for mystery meats -
that they are all made from the " floor sweepins " at the meat
processing plant. I always get the same dirty look ...
John T.
s***@webtv.net
2003-10-14 22:46:54 UTC
Permalink
Group: misc.rural Date: Tue, Oct 14, 2003, 5:52pm (CDT+1) From:
***@NOSPAMperth.net (_jj_)
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0"Sam Hopkins" <***@marconi.com>
wrote:
So I've searched forever and ever for the answer to, "What's in a
hotdog?" There doesn't seem to be anything printed. The ingredients just
say, "Beef parts." You always hear that a hot dog is the hoofs, butts,
noses, etc of animals. Is this true? Has anyone ever worked at a hotdog
plant? Sam

John T:
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0I tease my 11 year old - who has a taste for
mystery meats - that they are all made from the " floor sweepins " at
the meat processing plant. =A0 I always get the same dirty look ...
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0John T.

Ronny:
I love that good ol' "mean" streak you show here. :-) Reminds me of me
and some of my kinfolk! LoL
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