Discussion:
How to get racoons out of a garage?
(too old to reply)
p***@nospam.com
2008-11-16 00:42:27 UTC
Permalink
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.

A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.

I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.

This is on a farm.

Anyone got any ideas?

Paul
aemeijers
2008-11-16 01:00:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Loud radio and/or a bunch of kids for an hour, with the doors open. Most
raccoons I have met have no desire for a standoff, and if there is an
escape road they will take it.

--
aem sends....
Grizzly
2008-11-16 21:09:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by aemeijers
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Loud radio and/or a bunch of kids for an hour, with the doors open. Most
raccoons I have met have no desire for a standoff, and if there is an
escape road they will take it.
--
aem sends....
They hate subwoofers!
Terri
2008-11-17 03:40:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by aemeijers
Loud radio and/or a bunch of kids for an hour, with the doors open. Most
raccoons I have met have no desire for a standoff, and if there is an
escape road they will take it.
One wonders why he doesn't just drive in, leave the door open and
lay on the horn for awhile.
I'm having trouble believing he's not trolling. Someone who lives
on a farm would know a bit about coon habits by now.
That, and I haven't seen him come back yet...
p***@nospam.com
2008-11-17 06:03:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by aemeijers
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Loud radio and/or a bunch of kids for an hour, with the doors open. Most
raccoons I have met have no desire for a standoff, and if there is an
escape road they will take it.
Well, it looks like they are gone. I turned on a radio really loud,
and I left the walk in door open last night. I went out there at 2am
and banged on the lumber pile where they were going. No sign of them
at all. I closed the door, but left a window open just enough so they
could crawl out if they were still in there. I didn't want to trap
them because I know they can do a lot of damage. I have not seen them
since. I hope they are gone. I'm sure they are around the area, but
as long as they are outdoors that's fine.

I have a feeling they are the same pair that I saw a few weeks ago. I
was working under my car, outdoors, late at night when I heard some
noise. I looked up and saw 2 coons looking at me from about 6 feet
away. If it is these same ones, they seem to have no fear of humans.
Of course when I tossed a wrench at them, they ran off. They are both
quite large in size. Much larger than my barn cats. My cats hiss at
them, and they just walk on by. I guess that hiss dont impress them.

But who knows if they are the same, they all look alike.

Thanks to everyone that replied with help.

Paul
Jim
2008-11-17 12:49:55 UTC
Permalink
paulschaffer wrote:
[....]
Post by p***@nospam.com
I have a feeling they are the same pair that I saw a few weeks ago. I
was working under my car, outdoors, late at night when I heard some
noise. I looked up and saw 2 coons looking at me from about 6 feet
away. If it is these same ones, they seem to have no fear of humans.
Of course when I tossed a wrench at them, they ran off.
how lost is the wrench?
Stormin Mormon
2008-11-18 13:10:15 UTC
Permalink
Racoons steal tools?
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by p***@nospam.com
away. If it is these same ones, they seem to have no fear of humans.
Of course when I tossed a wrench at them, they ran off.
how lost is the wrench?
Jim
2008-11-18 13:21:40 UTC
Permalink
[....]
Post by Stormin Mormon
Post by Jim
I was working under my car, outdoors, late at night when I heard some
noise. I looked up and saw 2 coons looking at me from about 6 feet
away. If it is these same ones, they seem to have no fear of humans.
Of course when I tossed a wrench at them, they ran off.
how lost is the wrench?
Racoons steal tools?
as he wrote, it implies how he tossed a wrench off into
the darkness of the late night.
c***@snyder.on.ca
2008-11-18 17:20:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
[....]
Post by Stormin Mormon
Post by Jim
I was working under my car, outdoors, late at night when I heard some
noise. I looked up and saw 2 coons looking at me from about 6 feet
away. If it is these same ones, they seem to have no fear of humans.
Of course when I tossed a wrench at them, they ran off.
how lost is the wrench?
Racoons steal tools?
as he wrote, it implies how he tossed a wrench off into
the darkness of the late night.
Wouldn't doubt they steal tools. Last we saw of our shiny stainless
steel tea-kettle it was in care of a 45 lb plus Raccoon at Pinery
Provincial Park in Ontario, and moving at a pretty good clip!!!
aemeijers
2008-11-18 23:06:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
Post by Jim
[....]
Post by Stormin Mormon
Post by Jim
I was working under my car, outdoors, late at night when I heard some
noise. I looked up and saw 2 coons looking at me from about 6 feet
away. If it is these same ones, they seem to have no fear of humans.
Of course when I tossed a wrench at them, they ran off.
how lost is the wrench?
Racoons steal tools?
as he wrote, it implies how he tossed a wrench off into
the darkness of the late night.
Wouldn't doubt they steal tools. Last we saw of our shiny stainless
steel tea-kettle it was in care of a 45 lb plus Raccoon at Pinery
Provincial Park in Ontario, and moving at a pretty good clip!!!
They do like shiny. I think bling gets them laid.

--
aem sends...
AL
2008-11-19 00:17:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by aemeijers
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
Post by Jim
[....]
Post by Stormin Mormon
Post by Jim
I was working under my car, outdoors, late at night when I heard some
noise. I looked up and saw 2 coons looking at me from about 6
feet away. If it is these same ones, they seem to have no fear
of humans.
Of course when I tossed a wrench at them, they ran off.
how lost is the wrench?
Racoons steal tools?
as he wrote, it implies how he tossed a wrench off into the darkness
of the late night.
Wouldn't doubt they steal tools. Last we saw of our shiny stainless
steel tea-kettle it was in care of a 45 lb plus Raccoon at Pinery
Provincial Park in Ontario, and moving at a pretty good clip!!!
They do like shiny. I think bling gets them laid.
ain't that the way it goes?
The Daring Dufas
2008-11-17 16:54:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
Post by aemeijers
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Loud radio and/or a bunch of kids for an hour, with the doors open. Most
raccoons I have met have no desire for a standoff, and if there is an
escape road they will take it.
Well, it looks like they are gone. I turned on a radio really loud,
and I left the walk in door open last night. I went out there at 2am
and banged on the lumber pile where they were going. No sign of them
at all. I closed the door, but left a window open just enough so they
could crawl out if they were still in there. I didn't want to trap
them because I know they can do a lot of damage. I have not seen them
since. I hope they are gone. I'm sure they are around the area, but
as long as they are outdoors that's fine.
I have a feeling they are the same pair that I saw a few weeks ago. I
was working under my car, outdoors, late at night when I heard some
noise. I looked up and saw 2 coons looking at me from about 6 feet
away. If it is these same ones, they seem to have no fear of humans.
Of course when I tossed a wrench at them, they ran off. They are both
quite large in size. Much larger than my barn cats. My cats hiss at
them, and they just walk on by. I guess that hiss dont impress them.
But who knows if they are the same, they all look alike.
Thanks to everyone that replied with help.
Paul
Oh my God! Did you say that all coons look alike?

PETA will get you.

TDD
Stormin Mormon
2008-11-18 13:11:33 UTC
Permalink
Do you mean NAACP? Or maybe as Rush Limbuagh calls them, NAALCP.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by p***@nospam.com
quite large in size. Much larger than my barn cats. My cats hiss at
them, and they just walk on by. I guess that hiss dont impress them.
But who knows if they are the same, they all look alike.
Thanks to everyone that replied with help.
Paul
Oh my God! Did you say that all coons look alike?

PETA will get you.

TDD
p***@gmail.com
2020-06-26 14:41:04 UTC
Permalink
Ammonia is the best choice soak a few rags in it and put it in bags with holes for the smell to escape and throw it behind the pile and other places and they will leave to get the smell out leave the door open at day bc they are only out play night
SteveBell
2008-11-16 01:09:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Do you own a broom? Poke it in the hole. They'll run out the other end.
Continue poking them until they run out the door.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
Arlington, TX
sanity
2008-11-16 01:14:45 UTC
Permalink
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Ann
2008-11-16 01:41:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.

Just prop the overhead door open about a foot (too) and park your vehicle
outside (one fewer place for them to hide). Then leave them alone
overnight. Raccoons are nocturnal and if the weather is decent, they'll
likely leave.

Don't leave any food out where they can get to it.
Post by sanity
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime? I
know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come out.
Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered them.
When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there. Thats
the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not about
to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Don Bruder
2008-11-16 02:48:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net - If your "From:" address isn't on my whitelist,
or the subject of the message doesn't contain the exact text "PopperAndShadow"
somewhere, any message sent to this address will go in the garbage without my
ever knowing it arrived. Sorry... <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd> for more info
Claude Hopper
2008-11-16 03:51:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
--
Claude Hopper :)

? ? ¥
c***@snyder.on.ca
2008-11-16 05:37:04 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 22:51:25 -0500, Claude Hopper
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
What is a ,oad of crap?
Today's engines produce almost unmeasureable amounts of CO when the
cat is warmed up. Less than 1.5% is REQUIRED to pass E-Test, and most
properly tuned cars run 0.05% or less.
Both my vehicles run under 0.03% - one is a 1996.
ransley
2008-11-16 11:26:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 22:51:25 -0500, Claude Hopper
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you.   An hour or so later the problem will be
cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
What is a ,oad of crap?
Today's engines produce almost unmeasureable amounts of CO when the
cat is warmed up. Less than 1.5% is REQUIRED to pass E-Test, and most
properly tuned cars run 0.05% or less.
Both my vehicles run under 0.03% - one is a 1996.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
With a catalytic converter there is less, it just takes a bit longer
running the motor. In 5 minutes there will be enough to make anyone
very sick. Racoons are not dumb, they will move if their home is
attacked by noise, smoke or CO.
Sheldon
2008-11-16 20:45:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by ransley
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 22:51:25 -0500, Claude Hopper
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. � An hour or so later the problem will be
cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
What is a ,oad of crap?
Today's engines produce almost unmeasureable amounts of CO when the
cat is warmed up. Less than 1.5% is REQUIRED to pass E-Test, and most
properly tuned cars run 0.05% or less.
Both my vehicles run under 0.03% - one is a 1996.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
With a catalytic converter there is less, it just takes a bit longer
running the motor. In 5 minutes there will be enough to make anyone
very sick. Racoons are not dumb, they will move if their home is
attacked by noise, smoke or CO.
This BS too, CO is odorless, that's why it's so dangerous that CO
detectors have become manditory.
m***@rochester.rr.com
2008-11-24 16:33:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheldon
This BS too, CO is odorless, that's why it's so dangerous that CO
detectors have become manditory.
Yes, but you can't have CO without smoke from the car's exhaust, and
that smoke is noxious and unpleasant after a short time. The coughing
and watering eyes will tell any animal with a survival instinct to GET
OUT long before the CO does any permanent damage.
Don Bruder
2008-11-25 00:28:18 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by m***@rochester.rr.com
Post by Sheldon
This BS too, CO is odorless, that's why it's so dangerous that CO
detectors have become manditory.
Yes, but you can't have CO without smoke from the car's exhaust, and
Erm... In a word, *WRONG*.
While it is true that smoke and CO often "come as a set", the presence
of one is *TOTALLY* worthless as an indicator of the presence or absence
of the other. They can (and frequently do) exist separately - Smoke with
no CO, or CO with no smoke. Just because a fire/car exhaust/whatever is
putting out a cloud of smoke DOES NOT mean that it's putting out any
significant quantity of CO. It's *PROBABLE* that it is, but "probable"
doesn't equal "it is".
Post by m***@rochester.rr.com
that smoke is noxious and unpleasant after a short time. The coughing
and watering eyes will tell any animal with a survival instinct to GET
OUT long before the CO does any permanent damage.
Hint: Someone could pump your house so full of CO that there's nothing
else in the atmosphere, and you'd never have the first clue that they
had done so - You'd simply die, quite probably without ever noticing
anything beyond "Damn, this headache I've got really sucks". Likewise,
that same someone could pump your house so full of smoke that you can't
see your hand in front of your face, yet not put so much as a single
molecule of CO into your atmosphere.

Smoke is nothing more or less than particulates (whose chemical
composition could be almost anything) fine enough to remain at least
temporarily suspended in the air.

CO *MIGHT* be a component of smoke, but the presence of smoke *DOES NOT*
imply that CO is present.

CO, on the other hand, is a very clearly defined chemical compound that
can (and all too frequently does) exist without the slightest trace of
smoke.
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net - If your "From:" address isn't on my whitelist,
or the subject of the message doesn't contain the exact text "PopperAndShadow"
somewhere, any message sent to this address will go in the garbage without my
ever knowing it arrived. Sorry... <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd> for more info
Grizzly
2008-11-25 14:00:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by 'nam vet.
In article
Post by m***@rochester.rr.com
Post by Sheldon
This BS too, CO is odorless, that's why it's so dangerous that CO
detectors have become manditory.
Yes, but you can't have CO without smoke from the car's exhaust, and
Erm... In a word, *WRONG*.
While it is true that smoke and CO often "come as a set", the presence
of one is *TOTALLY* worthless as an indicator of the presence or absence
not put so much as a single
Post by 'nam vet.
molecule of CO into your atmosphere.
Smoke is nothing more or less than particulates (whose chemical
composition could be almost anything) fine enough to remain at least
temporarily suspended in the air.
CO *MIGHT* be a component of smoke, but the presence of smoke *DOES NOT*
imply that CO is present.
CO, on the other hand, is a very clearly defined chemical compound that
can (and all too frequently does) exist without the slightest trace of
smoke.
Absolutely right on. CO is an odorless gas..that headache and perhaps a
bit of nausea are the only indicators that something is amiss. Our
furnace at the old house had a cracked heat exchanger..it was a gas
furnace, so no odor was emitted and if the house had been airtight we
would have been dead, but it was poorly insulated and the crack where
the threshold met the back door was a full two inches without any
weatherstripping..we replaced the furnace, and no more headache/nausea.
There was never any smoke involved in that situation.
'nam vet.
2008-11-24 01:57:38 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by ransley
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 22:51:25 -0500, Claude Hopper
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you.   An hour or so later the problem will be
cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
What is a ,oad of crap?
Today's engines produce almost unmeasureable amounts of CO when the
cat is warmed up. Less than 1.5% is REQUIRED to pass E-Test, and most
properly tuned cars run 0.05% or less.
Both my vehicles run under 0.03% - one is a 1996.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
With a catalytic converter there is less, it just takes a bit longer
running the motor. In 5 minutes there will be enough to make anyone
very sick. Racoons are not dumb, they will move if their home is
attacked by noise, smoke or CO.
How 'bout a lawnmower? Put a little oil in the gas, and when it runs out
of gas turns itself off. I don't think they have cat.converters.
--
When the Power of Love,replaces the Love of Power.
that's Evolution.
Jim
2008-11-24 02:18:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by 'nam vet.
Post by ransley
Post by Claude Hopper
Claude Hopper
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running
[....]
Post by 'nam vet.
Post by ransley
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
What is a ,oad of crap?
Today's engines produce almost unmeasureable
[....]
Post by 'nam vet.
Post by ransley
With a catalytic converter there is less,
[....]
Post by 'nam vet.
How 'bout a lawnmower? Put a little oil in the gas, and when it runs out
of gas turns itself off. I don't think they have cat.converters.
or as it is right now you could use my Big Bubba Truck® with its
blown head gasket it's laying down a smoke screen a crop duster
would be proud of. oh yea, year model 1973, no catalytic converters,
just glass packs.
ktos
2008-11-24 03:06:29 UTC
Permalink
Out racoons, out!
Stormin Mormon
2008-11-24 02:44:07 UTC
Permalink
Doesn't need oil in the gas. That will just stink up your garage. Like you
say, leave the mower running. Don't go back in the garage for 24 hours or
so. And expect to have to haul out the racoon carcass. Or several carci. In
case of walking mower, lash the handle to something like an eye hook in the
wall. So the mower doesn't go vibrate and move and chop up something good.

No cat converters, but maybe racoon converters. Convert from live to dead.
The engine noise may drive them out (still alive). They may return, still
alive.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by ransley
With a catalytic converter there is less, it just takes a bit longer
running the motor. In 5 minutes there will be enough to make anyone
very sick. Racoons are not dumb, they will move if their home is
attacked by noise, smoke or CO.
How 'bout a lawnmower? Put a little oil in the gas, and when it runs out
of gas turns itself off. I don't think they have cat.converters.
--
When the Power of Love,replaces the Love of Power.
that's Evolution.
Don Bruder
2008-11-24 10:04:01 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by 'nam vet.
In article
Post by ransley
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 22:51:25 -0500, Claude Hopper
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine
running
and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be
cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
What is a ,oad of crap?
Today's engines produce almost unmeasureable amounts of CO when the
cat is warmed up. Less than 1.5% is REQUIRED to pass E-Test, and most
properly tuned cars run 0.05% or less.
Both my vehicles run under 0.03% - one is a 1996.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
With a catalytic converter there is less, it just takes a bit longer
running the motor. In 5 minutes there will be enough to make anyone
very sick. Racoons are not dumb, they will move if their home is
attacked by noise, smoke or CO.
How 'bout a lawnmower? Put a little oil in the gas, and when it runs out
of gas turns itself off. I don't think they have cat.converters.
You ain't been to California, have you? :)
--
Don Bruder - ***@sonic.net - If your "From:" address isn't on my whitelist,
or the subject of the message doesn't contain the exact text "PopperAndShadow"
somewhere, any message sent to this address will go in the garbage without my
ever knowing it arrived. Sorry... <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd> for more info
Ann
2008-11-16 13:46:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running
and close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will
be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind
the odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to
get rid of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
No, it's fact:
"Unsuccessful Suicide by Carbon Monoxide: A Secondary Benefit of Emissions
Control"
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1273253
"The 1980-1981 Boise, Idaho, study shows that with a functioning catalytic
converter either unmeasurable or sublethal quantities of CO appear in
automobile exhaust. Thus, emissions control has produced a secondary
benefit in reducing the number of suicides by CO poisoning from automobile
exhaust fumes."
MaryL
2008-11-16 14:06:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ann
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running
and close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will
be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind
the odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to
get rid of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
"Unsuccessful Suicide by Carbon Monoxide: A Secondary Benefit of Emissions
Control"
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1273253
"The 1980-1981 Boise, Idaho, study shows that with a functioning catalytic
converter either unmeasurable or sublethal quantities of CO appear in
automobile exhaust. Thus, emissions control has produced a secondary
benefit in reducing the number of suicides by CO poisoning from automobile
exhaust fumes."
A colleague of mine committed suicide a couple of years ago. His body was
found in his car, parked in a closed garage, and a suicide note by his side.
His car was fairly new, so I assume the catalytic converter was working. A
very sad ending to a very sad life.

MaryL
Jim
2008-11-16 14:27:07 UTC
Permalink
MaryL wrote:
[....]
Post by MaryL
Post by Ann
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running
and close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will
be cured.
[....]
Post by MaryL
Post by Ann
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
"Unsuccessful Suicide by Carbon Monoxide: A Secondary Benefit of Emissions
Control"
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1273253
"The 1980-1981 Boise, Idaho, study shows that with a functioning catalytic
converter either unmeasurable or sublethal quantities of CO appear in
automobile exhaust. Thus, emissions control has produced a secondary
benefit in reducing the number of suicides by CO poisoning from automobile
exhaust fumes."
A colleague of mine committed suicide a couple of years ago. His body was
found in his car, parked in a closed garage, and a suicide note by his side.
His car was fairly new, so I assume the catalytic converter was working. A
very sad ending to a very sad life.
MaryL
some people read a science study conducted and signed by
Dr. guy-0-mite and toss all variable conditions aside. while
assuming how Dr. guy-0-mite is the obvious authority they
just know their input is a one size fits all answer to the
question.

"with a functioning catalytic converter"
sanity
2008-11-16 14:39:43 UTC
Permalink
<snip>
Post by Ann
"Unsuccessful Suicide by Carbon Monoxide: A Secondary Benefit of Emissions
Control"
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1273253
"The 1980-1981 Boise, Idaho, study shows that with a functioning catalytic
converter either unmeasurable or sublethal quantities of CO appear in
automobile exhaust. Thus, emissions control has produced a secondary
benefit in reducing the number of suicides by CO poisoning from automobile
exhaust fumes."
That article assumes a perfectly tuned car with perfect burning of the
fuel/air mixture, and a thoroughly warmed up car and even then the car will
emit some carbon monoxide.

http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pages/communications/CO/co_car.html


http://www.wtic.com/Medical-Examiner--Auto-Exhaust-Accidentally-Killed/3072246


http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/common/standard/transform.jsp?requestURI=/healthatoz/Atoz/hl/sp/info/alert04072000.jsp
Ann
2008-11-16 15:38:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by sanity
<snip>
Post by Ann
"Unsuccessful Suicide by Carbon Monoxide: A Secondary Benefit of
Emissions Control"
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1273253 "The
1980-1981 Boise, Idaho, study shows that with a functioning catalytic
converter either unmeasurable or sublethal quantities of CO appear in
automobile exhaust. Thus, emissions control has produced a secondary
benefit in reducing the number of suicides by CO poisoning from
automobile exhaust fumes."
That article assumes a perfectly tuned car with perfect burning of the
fuel/air mixture, and a thoroughly warmed up car and even then the car
will emit some carbon monoxide.
Again, the quote says "reducing", not eliminating.

How did you access the full article? I get a broken-file error message.
Post by sanity
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pages/communications/CO/co_car.html
http://www.wtic.com/Medical-Examiner--Auto-Exhaust-Accidentally-Killed/3072246
http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/common/standard/transform.jsp?requestURI=/healthatoz/Atoz/hl/sp/info/alert04072000.jsp
sanity
2008-11-16 16:26:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
<snip>
Post by Ann
"Unsuccessful Suicide by Carbon Monoxide: A Secondary Benefit of
Emissions Control"
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1273253 "The
1980-1981 Boise, Idaho, study shows that with a functioning catalytic
converter either unmeasurable or sublethal quantities of CO appear in
automobile exhaust. Thus, emissions control has produced a secondary
benefit in reducing the number of suicides by CO poisoning from
automobile exhaust fumes."
That article assumes a perfectly tuned car with perfect burning of the
fuel/air mixture, and a thoroughly warmed up car and even then the car
will emit some carbon monoxide.
Again, the quote says "reducing", not eliminating.
How did you access the full article? I get a broken-file error message.
Post by sanity
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pages/communications/CO/co_car.html
http://www.wtic.com/Medical-Examiner--Auto-Exhaust-Accidentally-Killed/3072246
http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/common/standard/transform.jsp?requestURI=/healthatoz/Atoz/hl/sp/info/alert04072000.jsp
I just tried all three links and they work
Norminn
2008-11-16 16:11:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ann
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running
and close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will
be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind
the odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to
get rid of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
This is a load of crap.
"Unsuccessful Suicide by Carbon Monoxide: A Secondary Benefit of Emissions
Control"
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1273253
"The 1980-1981 Boise, Idaho, study shows that with a functioning catalytic
converter either unmeasurable or sublethal quantities of CO appear in
automobile exhaust. Thus, emissions control has produced a secondary
benefit in reducing the number of suicides by CO poisoning from automobile
exhaust fumes."
I don't know anything about catalytic converters, but one thought comes
to mind. A running engine
in a closed space is burning oxygen, giving off CO and CO2. It seems
there would come a point
that there is insufficient oxygen to support life....
Claude Hopper
2008-11-16 03:53:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
It's carbon monoxide that kills you not C02. Just C0.
--
Claude Hopper :)

? ? ¥
The Daring Dufas
2008-11-16 09:19:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
It's carbon monoxide that kills you not C02. Just C0.
Put a plastic bag over your head and tie it around
your neck. Get back to us about what CO2 does to you.

TDD
sanity
2008-11-16 06:12:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
--
You sure are wrong. There is enough carbon monoxide coming from your
exhaust regardless of the converter to kill any human.
Sheldon
2008-11-16 21:33:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. � An hour or so later the problem will be
cured.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
--
You sure are wrong. �There is enough carbon monoxide coming from your
exhaust regardless of the converter to kill any human.
Absolutely... CO builds in the blood much quicker than it dissipates.
Co Kills by attaching to red blood cells which prevents O2 from
attaching. It doesn't take much CO to shut down the brain... even if
medical help arrives prior to death it's almost always too late, there
is no quick way to flush the CO from the blood so it can be replaced
with O2... CPR alone will do next to nothing, concentrated O2 would
need to be administered simultaneously. In most all cases even if the
person lives they'll be brain dead, a vegetable. The only saving
grace is that the victim won't be concious so they won't know that
they're about to die. CO will kill any mammal... a pet dog or cat
may alert you from the odor associated with cooking gas but CO has no
odor, they'll die too. Along with functioning smoke detectors every
household should have at least one functioning CO detector... I say
functioning because they do no good if they don't work... now is the
time to install fresh batteries and test the units often as directed.
Batteries are cheap. Those who rent or stay in hotel rooms should not
rely on the units already there, they need to have their own, they do
not need to be permanently installed.
sanity
2008-11-16 06:16:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Bruder
Post by Ann
Post by sanity
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
But that solution pretty much guarantees that, unless he doesn't mind the
odor of rotting raccoon, he'll have to move the pile of lumber to get rid
of them.
Never mind the fact that if the idea is to gas them to death, any
vehicle with an operational catalytic converter doesn't put out enough
CO to be effective. (Same reason suicide by car exhaust is almost
unheard of anymore - one of the main functions of the cat-con is turning
CO into CO2)
http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/common/standard/transform.jsp?requestURI=/healthatoz/Atoz/hl/sp/info/alert04072000.jsp
Stormin Mormon
2008-11-16 02:03:20 UTC
Permalink
And, how does one get back in, to turn off the car?
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"sanity" <***@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:GmKTk.88941$***@bignews9.bellsouth.net...
If it's a detached garage drive your car in, leave the engine running and
close the door behind you. An hour or so later the problem will be cured.
Sheldon
2008-11-16 21:53:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
And, how does one get back in, to turn off the car?
Kind of silly to use a car to produce CO... that's like using a 10
pound maul to drive thumbtacks... any small push mower will produce
more than adequate CO to kill in an enclosed garage. But I don't know
why it should be difficult to rid a garage of racoons, remove all the
nesting places and any source of food nearby and the beasties will
leave right away. That garage is probably chock full with all kinds
of crap... the trash cans too. The racoons are living in that
stinkin' garage only because it's a classier residence than the
owner's house.
MaryL
2008-11-16 01:31:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Raccoons are nocturnal, so that is when they are most likely to leave the
garage. Years ago, my parents had raccoons (two of them) in their chimney.
They hired someone to come out and put a grid on top of the chimney so it
would not happen again, but of course he had to wait until the raccoons were
gone. He came out several nights before he was successful...But one thing
he did is something I thought might help you. That is, he used a flashlight
to shine down the chimney. The raccoons' eyes would glow if they were still
in the chimney. When he finally found a night with no "glowing eyes," he
secured the chimney with a *strong* grid (strong because raccoons are strong
and could easily have removed an ordinary bird screen). So, you might try
going out into your garage several times during the night and shine the
flashlight every place where the raccoons could hide, but especially behind
the pile of lumber.

MaryL
Boden
2008-11-16 01:42:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
You don't want to tangle with a mad raccoon. He wins...you loose.

Last summer we launched a boat only to discover a raccoon inside. You
don't want holes in the roof...how about the hull of a boat!

Finally got him into the water, shot him, sent the body to the state and
the state determined that he was rabid.

Be cautious.

Boden
Jim C
2008-11-16 02:24:26 UTC
Permalink
A gallon of amonia poured on the floor...a rope tied to the door handle so
it can be pulled shut after they leave
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Norminn
2008-11-16 03:19:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Call your animal control people. If unwilling to do that, just leave
the door open. At my son's
home this summer, raccoons - a whole clan of them - came foraging just
after dark to raid
his neighbor's cherry tree, returning every evening until the tree was
stripped.
Deer took care of the raspberries nearby :o) Raccoons tend to feed at
night and are crafty about how they obtain
food. You could probably spot them if you watch near dusk
c***@snyder.on.ca
2008-11-16 03:34:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
AMMONIA is your friend. soak some rags in ammonia and chuck them into
the garage, The coons WILL come out
HeyBub
2008-11-16 03:42:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
We had a yard cat that had a clutch of kittens in a flower bed. One night,
when the kittens were about three days old, tremendous commotion!

I opened the door just in time to see a pair of 30-pound raccoons being
seriously chased by a 12-pound momma cat! Momma cat came back about an hour
later after chasing the raccoons into the next county. I did notice raccoon
parts scattered on the sidewalk for about a mile north...

Never saw the 'coons again.
p***@gmail.com
2020-06-26 14:44:49 UTC
Permalink
I walked in to the garage to feed the cats and Saw a raccoon shuffle out while a three of the adult cats sat and watched it
Ken Olson
2021-01-18 12:46:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@gmail.com
I walked in to the garage to feed the cats and Saw a raccoon shuffle out while a three of the adult cats sat and watched it
I shoot them as much as I can. Trash pandas carry parasites that will
transfer to pets, plus they often have distemper.
--
ÄLSKAR - Fänga Dagen
Claude Hopper
2008-11-16 03:50:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Just shoot them with a .22 and it won't make much of a mess and if you
don't miss you won't make any holes in the wall.
--
Claude Hopper :)

? ? ¥
'nam vet.
2008-11-24 01:47:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Claude Hopper
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Just shoot them with a .22 and it won't make much of a mess and if you
don't miss you won't make any holes in the wall.
I bought some .22 shells, filled with bird shot. the 'coons" didn't like
that but an electric fence worked when I didn't feel like going outside
at night. they hate electricity.
--
When the Power of Love,replaces the Love of Power.
that's Evolution.
ransley
2008-11-16 04:03:57 UTC
Permalink
I was working on my overhead garage door.  The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days.  I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside.  I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot.  The thing is how do I coax them to
come out?  Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out.   Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them.  When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.  
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one.  Shooting is not an
option.  I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors.  I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all.  One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me.  If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
I got them out by lighting some damp paper in a steel bucket so it
made alot of smoke, then with a radio left on they were anoyed and
stayed away. After they go seal the hole.
Terri
2008-11-16 15:58:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out?
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one.
You're making it way too hard, not to mention spoiling the fun you
could have doing this.

You will need:
1. Fishing pole
2. Snickers or any other candybar
3. Camera
Instructions
Remove hook and leader from pole.
Remove candy bar wrapping from candy.
Wrap line around candybar and tie securely.
Position a chair or log upon which to sit
from a distance and place camera nearby.
Take fishing pole in hand and cast the line
containing the candy into the garage.
When you feel or see a tug, begin slowly reeling in
the line. After coons have exited the building completely,
go around behind them from a safe distance and shut garage door.

Get camera and take pictures.

(I can attest this method is a lot of fun when camping as well.)


Teh Edn
henrypenta
2008-11-17 14:37:48 UTC
Permalink
I was working on my overhead garage door.  The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days.  I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside.  I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot.  The thing is how do I coax them to
come out?  Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out.   Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them.  When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.  
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one.  Shooting is not an
option.  I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors.  I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all.  One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me.  If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
moth balls
HeyBub
2008-11-18 00:01:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
I don't have a suggestion, but I am curious.

Why do you want the 'coons out of the garage? They're just trying to stay
warm and make a living. Come spring, you'll have some baby 'coons to watch
grow up.

If they're making a mess or eating the dog's food or doing something
destructive, I'd understand and completely agree with you. But it seems as
if all you've got so far are some trespassers.
tin cup
2008-11-18 03:10:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by HeyBub
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
I don't have a suggestion, but I am curious.
Why do you want the 'coons out of the garage? They're just trying to stay
warm and make a living. Come spring, you'll have some baby 'coons to watch
grow up.
If they're making a mess or eating the dog's food or doing something
destructive, I'd understand and completely agree with you. But it seems as
if all you've got so far are some trespassers.
Coons have an ability to make mischief in a tin box. They pried the tin
roofing up on Father in Laws barn. Fixed that and they wrecked the eve
opening an on an on.
We had one as a pet. They play too hard. Sometimes he wouldn't return to
his pen. Then he would get into the boat and wreck whatever had some
fish scent on it or just out of sheer onyrness. They can smell a mint
candy at least an acre away. That's how I called him sometimes. I still
have marks on my arms and neck. Those claws are like razor hooks.
He would wrestle our Lab mercilessly. It got to where when the dog saw
him coming he would whimper and hide behind me. He would grab the dog by
the opposite foreleg and take him down. It was all fun to him but the
dog got tired of it. He would climb on our shoulders and assault our
heads. He loved to feel down inside your short or blouse. They like to
feel everything. Kids taught him a snicker. He made the sound whenever
he was about to start some of his shenanigans.
You can't live with a coon unless you are willing to live by their rules.
They will tear up just about anything that catches their fancy. They
notice everything even the seams in wall paper virtually unnoticeable by
us. they are imaginative and creative. You can't keep up with them
unless you are standing right there all the time. Buy plenty of band
aids and iodine.
If you got wild ones in your buildings best thing I can think of is a
couple of eager hounds. Just don't have anything you treasure in the way.
You don't want to watch and you will probably have to clean up.
Matt
2008-11-18 00:09:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
I am informed that most raccoons have considerable fear of various large
rotating objects.

I would suggest hanging a ceiling fan in your garage. If you can rig it
to turn on and off at random, that is likely to increase their anxiety
and cause them to leave all the sooner. If you can make the fan wobble
or otherwise appear unstable---as if it might fall---that will also
probably worry them more and get them out sooner.
HeyBub
2008-11-18 02:54:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Here's a copy of a story from another newsgroup back in 2006

PSYCHO RACCOONS RAMPAGE, RIOT, RAPE, AND KILL

Well, maybe not rape, but this Washington state masked gang HAS killed
almost a dozen cats and attacked dogs and humans.

The pack is lead by "one really big bad dude... a monster... They are in
command." The article reads like one has to step over the bodies littering
the area.

Various solutions have been tried: trapping, dogs, negotiations, trading
territory for peace. Nothing has worked. Strangely, no one in the article
has suggested using old double-barreled Betsy to blow their furry butts to
Animal Kingdom Come. Probably because all this mayhem is happening in
Olympia, the most liberal city is a very liberal state.

[link is now dead]
Ed
2008-11-18 05:12:12 UTC
Permalink
When I had raccoons in my attic the animal control officer said to
place a radio in the attic playing loud mexican music. I did and the
raccoons were gone within 24 hours. Then, the test to make sure they
are gone is to leave some chicken bones around and see if they get
taken.
sanity
2008-11-18 07:44:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed
When I had raccoons in my attic the animal control officer said to
place a radio in the attic playing loud mexican music. I did and the
raccoons were gone within 24 hours. Then, the test to make sure they
are gone is to leave some chicken bones around and see if they get
taken.
I tried that and it worked. Got rid of the raccoons but inherited 14 illegal
Mexicans.
Stormin Mormon
2008-11-18 13:14:47 UTC
Permalink
I read this after my other post. Honest.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by Ed
When I had raccoons in my attic the animal control officer said to
place a radio in the attic playing loud mexican music. I did and the
raccoons were gone within 24 hours. Then, the test to make sure they
are gone is to leave some chicken bones around and see if they get
taken.
I tried that and it worked. Got rid of the raccoons but inherited 14 illegal
Mexicans.
Jim
2008-11-18 13:26:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Post by Ed
When I had raccoons in my attic the animal control officer said to
place a radio in the attic playing loud mexican music. I did and the
raccoons were gone within 24 hours. Then, the test to make sure they
are gone is to leave some chicken bones around and see if they get
taken.
I read this after my other post. Honest.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
I tried that and it worked. Got rid of the raccoons but inherited 14 illegal
Mexicans.
is this your witness?
'nam vet.
2008-11-24 01:41:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
Post by Stormin Mormon
Post by Ed
When I had raccoons in my attic the animal control officer said to
place a radio in the attic playing loud mexican music. I did and the
raccoons were gone within 24 hours. Then, the test to make sure they
are gone is to leave some chicken bones around and see if they get
taken.
I read this after my other post. Honest.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
I tried that and it worked. Got rid of the raccoons but inherited 14 illegal
Mexicans.
is this your witness?
Reminds me of a bumper sticker I saw;
I Found Jesus... he was in my trunk when I returned from Mexico.
--
When the Power of Love,replaces the Love of Power.
that's Evolution.
AZ Nomad
2008-11-24 01:51:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by 'nam vet.
Post by Jim
Post by Stormin Mormon
Post by Ed
When I had raccoons in my attic the animal control officer said to
place a radio in the attic playing loud mexican music. I did and the
raccoons were gone within 24 hours. Then, the test to make sure they
are gone is to leave some chicken bones around and see if they get
taken.
I read this after my other post. Honest.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
I tried that and it worked. Got rid of the raccoons but inherited 14 illegal
Mexicans.
is this your witness?
Reminds me of a bumper sticker I saw;
I Found Jesus... he was in my trunk when I returned from Mexico.
Maybe combine it with a bit from Joe's Garage:

Jesus: he was a nice boy
he used to cut my grass.
Stormin Mormon
2008-11-24 02:41:24 UTC
Permalink
Bother. I got to read all the posts before replying. Second time in a couple
days someone already wrote what I did.

As to racoons out of the garage. Loud rock and roll music is supposed to
help. However, you may find the coons replaced by a rock band of teenagers,
jamming air guitar.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by 'nam vet.
Reminds me of a bumper sticker I saw;
I Found Jesus... he was in my trunk when I returned from Mexico.
Maybe combine it with a bit from Joe's Garage:

Jesus: he was a nice boy
he used to cut my grass.
Stormin Mormon
2008-11-24 02:39:36 UTC
Permalink
I like it... the other version is "I know Jesus is real, he mows my lawn."
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"'nam vet." <***@humboldt1.com> wrote in message news:georgewkspam-***@sn-ip.vsrv-sjc.supernews.net...

Reminds me of a bumper sticker I saw;
I Found Jesus... he was in my trunk when I returned from Mexico.
l***@invalid.com
2008-11-18 10:16:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed
When I had raccoons in my attic the animal control officer said to
place a radio in the attic playing loud mexican music. I did and the
raccoons were gone within 24 hours. Then, the test to make sure they
are gone is to leave some chicken bones around and see if they get
taken.
What if the raccoons are not Mexican?

I think the ones I see are from Rome, because they wear those collars
like Catholic priests. with the little white thingie in the center. :)
Stormin Mormon
2008-11-18 13:14:03 UTC
Permalink
Only works on Americoons. However, the next day you'll be invaded by
Mexicoons.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Ed" <***@usa.com> wrote in message news:a9c0a036-5761-4797-9cfd-***@d36g2000prf.googlegroups.com...

When I had raccoons in my attic the animal control officer said to
place a radio in the attic playing loud mexican music. I did and the
raccoons were gone within 24 hours. Then, the test to make sure they
are gone is to leave some chicken bones around and see if they get
taken.
Claude Hopper
2008-11-18 17:29:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@nospam.com
I was working on my overhead garage door. The weather got bad, so I
had to leave it open for a few days. I just repaired the door and
found 2 large coons inside. I shut the overhead door, but have the
walk in door open about a foot. The thing is how do I coax them to
come out? Are they most likely to come out at night or the daytime?
I know they will need feed and water so at some point they must come
out. Actually they knocked over a box of hardware that I had by the
overhead door when the door was closed, so thats how I discovered
them. When I went inside they ran behind a pile of lumber in there.
Thats the problem, they can go behind that pile and hide, and I am not
about to move that whole pile.
A live trap comes to mind, but I dont have one. Shooting is not an
option. I dont want holes in the walls, or a bloody mess to clean up
indoors. I can probably get a live trap on Monday, but not till then.
I thought of putting some corn outside the door, but that dont mean
they wont go back inside after eating it, and if I am around to shut
the door, they wont come out at all. One of them actually went in the
rafters while I was in there and was looking at me. If I had my rifle
handy, it would have been an easy shot, but holes in the roof are not
an option either.
This is on a farm.
Anyone got any ideas?
Paul
Try a stick of dynamite.
--
Claude Hopper :)

? ? ¥
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